South West European Region

2014 Election
2014 Results
1. William Dartmouth (UKIP) 484184 32.3% (+10.2%)
2. Ashley Fox (Conservative) 433151 28.9% (-1.4%)
3. Julia Reid (UKIP) (242092)
4. Julie Girling (Conservative) (216576)
5. Clare Moody (Labour) 206124 13.7% (+6.1%)
6. Molly Scott Cato (Green) 166447 11.1% (+1.8%)
. (Liberal Democrat) 160376 10.7% (-6.5%)
. (Independence from Europe) 23169 1.5% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 15081 1% (-0.6%)
. (BNP) 10910 0.7% (-3.2%)
Current sitting MEPs
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William Dartmouth (UKIP) Born 1949. As the Earl of Dartmouth he was a Conservative member of the House of Lords until the exclusion of hereditary peers. Defected to UKIP in 2007. MEP for South West England since 2009.
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Ashley Fox (Conservative) Born 1969. Educated at the Kings School, Worcester and Bristol Polytechnic. Solicitor. Contested Bath 2001. Bristol councillor 2002-2009. MEP for South West England since 2009.
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Julia Reid (UKIP) Born in London. Educated at John Bentley School and Bath University. Research biochemist. Contested South West Region 2009, Chippenham 2010. Former member of the SDP. MEP for the South West since 2014
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Julie Girling (Conservative) Former Cotswold District councillor. Former Gloucestershire County councillor. Contested South West in 2004 European elections. MEP for South West England since 2009.
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Clare Moody (Labour) Trade union officer. Contested South West region 2004 European elections, Salisbury 2005, Wiltshire police commissioner election 2012. MEP for the South West since 2014
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Molly Scott Cato (Green) Born 1963, Wales. Educated at Oxford University. University professor. Stroud councillor since 2011. Contested Preseli Pembrokeshire 1997, 2005, South West region 2009 European election. MEP for the South West since 2014

Full candidates for the 2014 European election are here.

2009 Election
2009 Results
1. Giles Chichester (Conservative) 468742 30.2% (-1.3%)
2. Trevor Coleman (UKIP) 341845 22.1% (-0.5%)
3. Graham Watson (Liberal Democrat) 266253 17.2% (-1.2%)
4. Julie Girling (Conservative) (234371)
5. William Dartmouth (UKIP) (170923)
6. Ashley Fox (Conservative) (156247)
. (Green) 144179 9.3% (+2.1%)
. (Labour) 118716 7.7% (-6.8%)
. (BNP) 60889 3.9% (+0.9%)
. (Pensioners) 37785 2.4% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 25313 1.6% (n/a)
. (Chrisian) 21329 1.4% (n/a)
. (Mebyon Kernow) 14922 1% (n/a)
. (Socialist Labour) 10033 0.6% (n/a)
. (No2EU) 9741 0.6% (n/a)
. Katie Hopkins (Independent) 8971 0.6% (n/a)
. (Libertas) 7292 0.5% (n/a)
. (Fair Pay Fair Trade) 7151 0.5% (n/a)
. (Jury Team) 5758 0.4% (n/a)
. (Wai D Your Decision) 789 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
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Giles Chichester (Conservative) Born 1946, London. Formerly worked for his family business, publishing maps and guides. First elected as MEP for Devon and East Plymouth 1994. MEP for the South West since 1999. Former leader of the Conservative group in the European parliament, he stood down in 2008 after it was revealed he had claimed Parliamentary expenses for a family business. He was later cleared of a conflict of interest by the European Parliament.
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Trevor Coleman (UKIP) Born 1941, St Breward. Former police officer and television script advisor. MEP for the South West since 2008, suceeding Graham Booth upon his retirement. Contested Teignbridge 2005.
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Graham Watson (Liberal Democrat) Born 1956, Rothesay. Educated at City of Bath Boys School and Heriot-Watt University. Prior to his elected worked as a university administrator, head of David Steel’s office and for HSBC. First elected as MEP for Somerset and North Devon 1994. Leader of the Liberal group in the European Parliament 2002-2009. Knighted in 2011.
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Julie Girling (Conservative) Former Cotswold District councillor. Former Gloucestershire County councillor. Contested South West in 2004 European elections. MEP for South West England since 2009.
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William Dartmouth (UKIP) Born 1949. As the Earl of Dartmouth he was a Conservative member of the House of Lords until the exclusion of hereditary peers. Defected to UKIP in 2007. MEP for South West England since 2009.
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Ashley Fox (Conservative) Born 1969. Educated at the Kings School, Worcester and Bristol Polytechnic. Solicitor. Contested Bath 2001. Bristol councillor 2002-2009. MEP for South West England since 2009.


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Comments - 238 Responses on “Europe South West”
  1. Ye gods

    Only a week into the Brexit negotiations and the Sun’s front page is Up Yours Senors! As the government masquarades its Brexit induced bowing and scraping to the Saudis with manufactured outrage over easter eggs.

    Meanwhile, on planet UKPR, we have Plopwellian Tory, who couldn’t fight his way out of a paper bag, salivating over sending other people to war on his behalf.

    And we have Lancs Observer getting excited about who will be to blame if North Korea fires a nuke and the US responds, totally oblivious to the fact that we will all be dead under such a happy scenario.

    Only another two years of this to go folks.

  2. It was more that it’s self evident that whoever fires the first nuke is to blame and yet STILL some on here would still blame America for depending S Korea.

    Incidentally no idea why you think we’d all be dead.

    I imagine N Korea would be the only Country no-one would miss (except the Peter Taaffes of this world).

    HH – you’re as delusional as Farron if you’re starting to blame any News event on the Leave vote. Get over it!

  3. “Incidentally no idea why you think we’d all be dead.”

    I’ll give you a clue then….do you think China would allow the US to explode a nuclear weapon just the other side of its border without retaliating?

    And in any nuclear attack on the US we would be obliged to join the war on their side as per our NATO obligations hence any retaliation would also quite likely target us and all the NATO allies.

  4. “HH – you’re as delusional as Farron if you’re starting to blame any News event on the Leave vote. Get over it!”

    If you’re seriously trying to tell me that the posturing over Gibraltar isn’t a direct consequence of the Leave vote you must be a total halfwit.

    People like you and Plopwellian Tory can shout “get over it” as much as you like but nothing can obscure the fact that the Brexit promises your side made are collapsing like a house of cards and those of us who opposed that campaign have every right to voice our opinion.

    We were told there would be no tariffs, free trade and no more contributions to the EU (leaving £350m to be spent on the NHS) because “they need us more than we need them”. Shown in a very short time to be a pack of lies.

  5. Well they do say you know someone’s lost an argument when all they have left is insults.

    HH – every prediction made by DC, GO, the BoE, CBI, Clegg & Blair all failed to materialise. No sudden shock, no extra £2k pa worse off in the next year- instead we’ve had record FTSE levels (and FTSE 250 – remember that better measure YOU told us all to check on here in 6 or 9 months’ time), ever falling unemployment figures, record employment figures, rising retail sales, good optimism figures in each sector.

    In fact every prediction you made, yes YOU personally HH has been proven to be false.

    Indeed as Andrew Neil said to Alistair Campbell – “you’re becoming delusional [in the face of all those facts] if you think that Leavers regret their vote. Quite the opposite is true. Plus most Remain voters have now come to accept it”

    At least some such as Carney and Straw Jnr now admit that the dire warnings were false.

    On the contrary, Art 50 has been triggered, we’ll be saving £Billions (and not just on MEPs and staff and that gravy train) from 2019 onwards.

    Even Farron has conceded we won’t be paying any EU contributions after 2020. Indeed under David Davis’s proposal it would be unlawful to do so [not that I’m a fan of the DC-esque binding by enshrining any payments into a law whether it’s overseas aid or a ban on income tax rises].

  6. HH – as for Gibraltar, a Tory MP yesterday reminded us that DC did indeed (‘posture’ in your words) on Gibraltar in 2013 and so no it’s not as a consequence – it’s as a direct consequence of Spain seeking a veto from the EU.

    Any British PM should stand up for British territory. Just a shame TB didn’t seem to want to.

    I don’t know any Western military experts who share your view re N Korea either. By defending S Korea, the USA could well simply respond by either knocking out the missile or responding conventionally. But again, if N Korea fired first I am simply amazed that anyone questions the legitimacy of the US responding.

    I see only 5% prospects of any nuclear firing (other than a test) in our lifetime. Far lower than during the ’70s or ’80s. But if there is and the result is a response – by conventional or nuclear means – and it meant the obliteration of Iran or N Korea, then yes, that would be acceptable to 80% of the West, as responses have been as the NY article detailed.

  7. HH – As for “they need us more than we need them” – it doesn’t really matter whether you believe it or not, but it is a fact on imports v exports.

    You – and Hezza – seem to be stuck in a time prior to the year 2000.

    Yes back then 54% of our trade was with the EU.

    But its been declining ever since to just 44% 2 years ago (even with all of those new EU countries since 2004).

    We exported £222 Bn to the EU (but £288 Bn outside).

    It’s another reason why SME owners voted Leave. Over 94% of UK businesses don’t export and yet 100% had to put up with any and every EU regulation.

  8. Is Lancs Observer another parody account of Conservative Estimate’s?

    This is not a site for whether or not Brexit was right or wrong, nobody wants to read any of that crap on here.

    H.H. I would suggest you would avoid falling for Lancs bait.

  9. NTY UK – I think anyone reading HH’s post above would reasonably say he was baiting me with his post, quite apart from the insult.

    Plus (again as I often have to point out on here), I was merely quoting facts – given HH’s belief – not arguing a case over 9 months after the event.

  10. Play nice!

  11. I agree with NYT UK this is a forum for a conversation around polling not a brexit debating club

  12. ‘I agree with NYT UK this is a forum for a conversation around polling not a brexit debating club’

    Completely disagree

    I would have thought this is an ideal place to debate what many people think is the biggest mistake in British history

    The right-wing Brexiters certainly seem ti think so (Lancs, Kieran, Runnymead, Cons Estimate) who haven’t stopped gloating since they unexpectedly won

  13. Thanks NTY that’s good advice.

    Lancs, you insulted me first by calling me delusional like Farron. I agree with NTY that you’ve sadly turned from a respected, independent minded poster into a kind of male Katie Hopkins. As someone who has my own small business trading internationally I don’t see why my personal experience of the impact of Brexit deserves to be belittled. Please do tell me what international trading experience you have?

  14. Tim’s right. Brexit will so utterly dominate politics over the next 10 years it will be impossible not to debate it. It sadly looks like the government and tabloids will be constantly throwing non-issue distractions like Gibraltar and easter eggs onto the front pages (“right wing political correctness” – an excellent description I heard yesterday) – to distract from the grubby business of Brexit negotiation compromise, hence that will also inevitably be a feature of the debate here.

  15. One last post from me before I attack a mountain of work – Lancs says “I was merely quoting facts”, and says this quite often in his posts. Yet when it is pointed out when his facts are wrong or misleading he ignores it – see the discussion on the Neath thread on the SA Rand. I happen to do a fair amount of business related to the Rand and am in South Africa often, and know for a fact that the strength rather than so-called weakness of the currency is regarded as the bigger problem by SA business at present. Yet a tinpot regional journalist who has probably never set foot in the country thinks he is an expert and uses any dodgy so-called fact to bash the communist ANC. Makes my blood boil and a good example of why journalists are disliked these days.

    Anyhow enough from me for today.

  16. There isn’t really anything else besides Brexit to discuss.

  17. “The right-wing Brexiters certainly seem ti think so (Lancs, Kieran, Runnymead, Cons Estimate) who haven’t stopped gloating since they unexpectedly won”.

    Show me where I’ve posted anything that could be described as gloating.

  18. “There isn’t really anything else besides Brexit to discuss.”

    Constituency profiles, the Boundary Review, the 2017 local elections, the opinion polls and objective news about Brexit and Scottish independence…

  19. Be in doubt that, had Remain won, you’d never have heard the end of it.

  20. Where is Pepps? I need him to see this thread, a big argument that for once I didn’t start XD

    In all seriousness I don’t see the problem in debating Brexit or any other issue but personal insults (from both sides) should be avoided. If people cant do that then yes we should stick to non partisan topics.

    I do have to tentatively agree with one point in particular that HH made though re Lancs when he says he does have a tendency to conjure up quite flaky, dubious and oftentimes totally false pieces of information as justifications for his own political opinions while covering it in a veneer of impartiality, practically every debate I’ve had with him he tends to do this. I’d much sooner Lancs just spoke his mind like everyone else here does rather than finding some flimsy piece of info and warping it into “evidence” that supposedly settles the matter.

    But anywho play nice everyone

  21. ‘Be in doubt that, had Remain won, you’d never have heard the end of it.’

    If Remain had won it would be back to business as normal so there wouldn’t be as much to discuss

    And do you honestly think the likes of Farage, Grayling and the other alt-Righr Brexit nutters wouldn’t be calling for a second referendum if Remain had won by a similar margin

    RE: NTY UK
    Constituency profiles, the Boundary Review, the 2017 local elections, the opinion polls almost pale into insignificance compared to the Brexit negotiations

  22. ‘But anywho play nice everyone’

    Why

    These people have ruined our country for us, our children and their children

    Nigel Farage might be the man of the moment but I reckon 10 years from now he will be the most hated man in the country in the unlikely event he stocks around to watch the mayhem he created unfold

  23. “These people have ruined our country for us, our children and their children”

    *liberated

    Honestly, if you want a sparring partner on here TJ, you’ve found one.

  24. @Tim
    ”Nigel Farage might be the man of the moment but I reckon 10 years from now he will be the most hated man in the country”

    Nigel Farage is already hated it’s just the media seem to have a curious fascination with him.

    ”And do you honestly think the likes of Farage, Grayling and the other alt-Righr Brexit nutters wouldn’t be calling for a second referendum if Remain had won by a similar margin”

    Perhaps they would but the majority of leave voters would have accepted the result just like the majority of remain voters have accepted the result of the referendum. It’s just the remain voters who haven’t tend to be the type who go on protests and have columns in the Guardian so appear like a far bigger proportion of the total than they actually are.

    ”These people have ruined our country for us, our children and their children”

    Please can we stop the hyperbole, I’m not going to claim that Brexit will be easy and immediately lead to a land of milk and honey but leaving a rather undemocratic supranational body that is on shaky economic ground itself is hardly a world ending calamity. A bit of nuance from both sides would be nice.

    ”If Remain had won it would be back to business as normal so there wouldn’t be as much to discuss”

    Not really the referendum was Britain’s one trump card to leverage the EU and get exclusion from its (often poorly thought out) schemes and its incessant drive for ever closer union. Arguably Britain should have saved the referendum to use as a threat for such a time when the EU was trying to force Britain to sign up to further integration though I’m not sure if constitutionally it would have actually been possible for parliament to legislate for an referendum to be automatically triggered at some future date if certain conditions are met.

  25. ”Where is Pepps? I need him to see this thread, a big argument that for once I didn’t start XD”

    @Rivers
    Yeah I know haha :D. I am trying to get less involved in arguments because it’s not what the site is supposed to be for. It’s one thing discussing Brexit it’s another turning it into a full blown row especially when people use personal insults.

  26. “These people have ruined our country for us, our children and their children”.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Think_of_the_children

  27. Hehe what rot!

  28. Wow isn’t this pathetic. No wonder people hate politicians, they never listen.

  29. HH – Untrue.

    I in fact said “you’re as delusional as Farron IF you’re starting to blame any news event on Brexit”

    So I assume that means you admit you are blaming any News event on Brexit 😉

    Incidentally, it’s hardly surprising. You are well known (though more so in previous years) for coming on here and simply saying that’s “horses*it” and then disappearing – it’s simply the first time I have raised the fact that you do so.

    Andrew Neil said Alistair Campbell was becoming delusional as he was refusing top accept any of the facts mentioned. He;’s perfectly entitled to hold his view but it is simply not based on facts to date. Merely his opinion of what might happen after 2019 – very much so like your own.

    Indeed in your case, it’s even more bizarre as you refer to your international trading experience (AC clearly has none) and then you continue to plainly ignore both the trade figures and the FTSE levels – the latter of which you said we should all watch 6 or 9 months after the Leave vote.

    We al err – it’s not a problem. What is though is that you simply refuse to acknowledge that you said these things and have been proven wrong by the facts so far.

    Yes, you may well be right post-2019, but over the past 9 months you and the dire sudden consequences warned of by a whole collection including GO/DC/BoE were al wrong.

    At least some of them recognise this reality.

    In fact as Brendan O’Neill pointed out, the majority have remained calm and resolute in the face of abuse and challenges from sore losers over the past 9 months. Thankfully now most Remain voters accept the fact. It’s a shame the small clique of Farron, Lammy et al never will.

    I see in your other posts you have again resorted to random abuse – quite apart from being in breach of AW’s site, it’s always a somewhat bizarre move for someone you have never met, but I realise it goes on online – which again proves my first point: you have simply lost the argument. As for the rand, I will let others correct you – as I see they already have done so on that thread.

    I think it will simply take even more time for some to realise that their worldview of the past 40 years was wrong on the EU. Yet more great UK economic data came out today. It’s just a shame some don’t celebrate that.

  30. Tim
    “And do you honestly think the likes of Farage, Grayling and the other alt-Righr Brexit nutters wouldn’t be calling for a second referendum if Remain had won by a similar margin”

    Farage said exactly that just a couple of days before the vote, he said “In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way”

    Yet we’re Remoaners apparently…

  31. Referenda is probably a bad example to cite re behaviour, as of course the EU is well-used to asking the Irish or French or whoever to keep having them until they gave the answer the EU wanted.

    The difference here is that the UK took the irreversible position to leave that even the person who drafted the Article never envisioned would ever happen.

    Indeed merely mentioning the prospect that any other EU nation might want to have the same say really infuriates them all. It really is like you’re tearing down their palace which they thought would exist forever.

  32. ”Farage said exactly that just a couple of days before the vote, he said “In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way”
    Yet we’re Remoaners apparently…”

    @Rivers

    Sure if Remain had won there would be a prominent, loud, minority of leave voters lead by the likes of Nigel Farage who would not accept the result just like there is a prominent loud minority of remainers trying to strop Brexit. But most Leave voters would have accepted the result just like most Remain voters have now.

    Saying ‘Nigel Farage would have done the same’ as justification for doing anything doesn’t exactly set standards very high at all..

  33. ‘Farage said exactly that just a couple of days before the vote, he said “In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way”’

    And you can bet any protest organised by Farage would be considerably more violent than those we’ve seen from the remainers

    It be like Oswald Mosley’s Black Shirts in 1936 all again

  34. ‘Not really the referendum was Britain’s one trump card to leverage the EU and get exclusion from its (often poorly thought out) schemes and its incessant drive for ever closer union. Arguably Britain should have saved the referendum to use as a threat for such a time when the EU was trying to force Britain to sign up to further integration though I’m not sure if constitutionally it would have actually been possible for parliament to legislate for an referendum to be automatically triggered at some future date if certain conditions are met.’

    I don’t disagree with that analysis

    Whilst I favoured staying in the EU (obviously) I had no desire to integrate further into it – and I agree that holding a referendum if they tried to force it on us would make more sense – although obviously it would make a Leave vote even more likely

  35. This was precisely the mindset I spoke of:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/07/labour-split-america-missile-strike-syria-jeremy-corbyn-comes/

    Corbyn just can’t bring himself to back anything America does, whereas his deputy Tom Watson had already supported the missile strikes as a response to the chemical attack in Syria.

    Although as ever the best quotes come from their own side:

    Michael Dugher MP: “It takes time for Seamus to run the press release by the Kremlin, Stop the War + the Morning Star.”

    Frank Field: “Sadly some in our Party today are like those magnetic robots I remember on children’s toys. They’ll always end up pointing the finger at Washington or London. They never seem to blame Tehran or Moscow strangely enough. Perhaps they should get their batteries checked.”

  36. ‘Corbyn just can’t bring himself to back anything America does, whereas his deputy Tom Watson had already supported the missile strikes as a response to the chemical attack in Syria.’

    That’s entirely right

    Corbyn no don’t believes the Russian line that Syrian planes hit a rebels held chemical weapon depot – of which there hads been no evidence whatsoever

    I’ve been one of Trump’s staunchest critics but I fully salute him for his actions earlier today

    And Russia won’t consider the vile despot Assad worth going to war with the US over

    Days look numbered for Assad. I just hope his wife’s fate is the same as his

  37. I get the joke it certainly does sit well with Russia if the UK don’t embark on missile strikes. However, Assad is pretty much Putin’s crash dummy; chemical bombs dropped the Syrian regime is behind it with the support of Russia, the response is to bomb Assad but oddly quiet on the consequences of Russia’s involvement.

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