Scotland European Region

2014 Election
2014 Results
1. Ian Hudghton (SNP) 389503 29% (-0.1%)
2. David Martin (Labour) 348219 25.9% (+5.1%)
3. Ian Duncan (Conservative) 231330 17.2% (+0.4%)
4. Alyn Smith (SNP) (194752)
5. Catherine Stihler (Labour) (174110)
6. David Coburn (UKIP) 140534 10.5% (+5.2%)
. (Scottish Green) 108305 8.1% (+0.8%)
. (Liberal Democrats) 95319 7.1% (-4.4%)
. (Britain First) 13639 1% (n/a)
. (BNP) 10216 0.8% (-1.7%)
. (No2EU) 6418 0.5% (-0.4%)
Current sitting MEPs
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Ian Hudghton (SNP) Former leader of Angus council. MEP for North-East Scotland 1998-1999, for Scotland since 1999.
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David Martin (Labour) Born 1954, Edinburgh. Educated at Libertson High School. Lothian regional councillor 1982-1984. MEP for Lothian 1984. MEP for Scotland since 1999.
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Ian Duncan (Conservative) Born in Alyth. Educated at Alyth High School and St Andrews University. Public affairs professional and former Scottish Parliamentary clerk. Contested Aberdeen South 2003 Scottish election. MEP for Scotland since 2014.
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Alyn Smith (SNP) Born 1973, Glasgow. Educated at Leeds and Heidelberg Universities. Commercial lawyer. MEP for Scotland since 2004.
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Catherine Stihler (Labour) Born 1973, Bellshill. Educated at Coltness High School and St Andrews University. Former researcher for Anne Begg. MEP for Scotland since 1999. Contested Angus 1997, Dunfermline and West Fife by-election 2006.
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David Coburn (UKIP) Born in Glasgow. Businessman. Contested Old Bexley and Sidcup 2010. MEP for Scotland since 2014.

Full candidates for the 2014 European election are here.

2009 Election
2009 Results
1. Ian Hudghton (SNP) 321007 29.1% (+9.4%)
2. David Martin (Labour) 229853 20.8% (-5.6%)
3. Struan Stevenson (Conservative) 185794 16.8% (-0.9%)
4. Alyn Smith (SNP) (160504)
5. George Lyon (Liberal Democrat) 127038 11.5% (-1.6%)
6. Catherine Stihler (Labour) (114927)
. (Scottish Green) 80442 7.3% (+0.5%)
. (UKIP) 57788 5.2% (-1.5%)
. (BNP) 27174 2.5% (+0.8%)
. (Socialist Labour) 22135 2% (n/a)
. (Christian) 16738 1.5% (n/a)
. (Scottish Socialist) 10404 0.9% (-4.3%)
. Duncan Robertson (Independent) 10189 0.9% (n/a)
. (No2EU) 9693 0.9% (n/a)
. (Jury Team) 6257 0.6% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
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Ian Hudghton (SNP) Former leader of Angus council. MEP for North-East Scotland 1998-1999, for Scotland since 1999.
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David Martin (Labour) Born 1954, Edinburgh. Educated at Libertson High School. Lothian regional councillor 1982-1984. MEP for Lothian 1984. MEP for Scotland since 1999.
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Struan Stevenson (Conservative) Born 1948, Ballantrae. Educated at West of Scotland Agricultural College. Formerly director of a family farmying and tourism company. Girvan councillor 1970-1974, Kyle and Carrick councillor 1972-1992. Contested Carrick, Cumnock and Doon Valley 1987, Edinburgh South 1992, Dumfries 1997. North-East Scotland European by-election 1999. MEP for Scotland since 1999.
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Alyn Smith (SNP) Born 1973, Glasgow. Educated at Leeds and Heidelberg Universities. Commercial lawyer. MEP for Scotland since 2004.
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George Lyon (Liberal Democrat) Born 1956, Rothesay. Educated at Rothesay Academy. Farmer. MSP for Argyll and Bute 1999-2007. Deputy Minister for Finance and Parliamentary business in the Scottish executive 2005-2007.
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Catherine Stihler (Labour) Born 1973, Bellshill. Educated at Coltness High School and St Andrews University. Former researcher for Anne Begg. MEP for Scotland since 1999. Contested Angus 1997, Dunfermline and West Fife by-election 2006.
Comments - 423 Responses on “Europe Scotland”
  1. Looking at NTYs Conservative target list at number 9 is Edinburgh South. At the 2015 General election the SNP candidate said some naive and downright foolish things on social media which must have contributed to the swing to the SNP in this seat of only 10.9% when you would have expected more when compared to swings achieved elsewhere against Labour incumbents. There is also a reasonable Scottish Green vote here (2090 votes, 4.2%) which could be helpful to the SNP. For these reasons, given a decent candidate, I expect SNP to be favourites here as there is little to work on for the Tories as far as LibDem and UKIP tactical voters may be concerned but new boundaries are helpful.

  2. Bill,

    If the SNP do start “losing support all over the place” I would suggest that the Conservatives would be the least likely direct beneficiary.

  3. But who five years ago could have foreseen a poll where the tories were polling twice labour’s %vote in Scotland!?

  4. SNP supporters?

  5. Sky approval ratings:

    Ruth Davidson
    Good: 53%
    Bad: 36%
    Net approval: +17

    Theresa May
    Good: 48%
    Bad: 47%
    Net approval: +1

    Nicola Sturgeon
    Bad: 54%
    Good: 42%
    Net: -12

    Kezia Dugdale
    Bad: 50%
    Good: 36%
    Net: -14

    Jeremy Corbyn
    Bad: 77%
    Good: 16%
    Net: -61

  6. Those approval ratings are for Scotland by the way from a survey of 2,000.

  7. By the way the latest Westminster poll is the highest Conservative vote recorded in an opinion poll since May 1983 in Scotland and the lowest Labour vote in a Westminster poll in Scotland ever…

  8. Those are some very low “don’t know” scores. Is Scotland that much more politically engaged than rUK?

  9. I think they’ve had so many votes recently – indyref, 2015 GE, 2016 SP, Brexit, now council elections coming up and the spectre of whingyref2 that very few still have the bliss of don’t know

  10. I am prepared to bet that no properly performed and weighted poll for Scotland will ever show May as more popular than Sturgeon

  11. I do think the vast majority have become politicised by IndyRef, GE2015, SP2016 election and the EU referendum.

  12. The ‘SkyData’ poll starts with a subset of the population that can afford Sky.
    Even with attempted weighting I’m sceptical the faults of the niche sample can be corrected for.

  13. ADVISABLANON

    You make a very good point in explaining why the Sky poll is likely to wrong-thanks for that.

    If pro-union supporters allow themselves to be convinced that May’s stance against Sturgeon is widely supported, this will generate the complacency which so boosted the Yes vote in 2014.

  14. After many years of unmoderated contributions to this site suddenly my last 2 comments are stuck in moderation.

    WHY???

  15. I’ve had a thought, and actually the most natural place for the Tories to get a big increase in their vote share is from non-voters. Think about it: only 56% actually voted in May 2016. Many of those who didn’t vote are unionists, not nationalists. Many of them feel powerless as the government presses forward with a referendum that they don’t want.

    The Tories should test the following message in May 2017: “Send a message to the SNP by saying no to a second referendum and voting Conservative & Unionist in the local elections.”

    The “No to a second referendum” message that the Tories used in 2016 could have played better in 206 if Scots had known that we’d be facing Brexit, I think.

  16. @BILL PARTICK

    I agree. I do think they are sending that message to voters – all the MSPs I follow seem to spend their weekends collecting signatures for a petition against IndyRef2.

    Pitching themselves as the ‘No2IndyRef2’ party would pay dividends in May 2017 and beyond.

  17. Amused to see the Tory MPSs’ amendment (Ref in April 2019) – as I said: it fulfils Sturgeon’s request of Spring 2019 and is also the week after Brexit.

  18. Why is that assuming?

  19. Or amusing rather 😛

  20. PT: I bet you laughed at Labour when they said they were going to appeal to non-voters.

    Non-voters don’t vote. Targeting them (which generally means little more than hoping they will vote for you) is not much of a plan.

  21. Poll Troll,

    Labour’s mistake was not targeting non-voters, but targeting non-voters who were unlikely to come out to vote for them. I’m not sure that the same is true for unionists who haven’t voted in recent parliamentary elections.

    “Non-voters don’t vote.”

    Not really. Sometimes, I have been a non-voter. Sometimes, I’ve voted. And the people I’m thinking about do sometimes vote, as in Indyref 1.

  22. “And the people I’m thinking about do sometimes vote, as in Indyref 1”.

    There’s a big difference between voting in a referendum that’s about what country you live in (personally, much that turnout was high in the indyref, I can’t understand those who seemingly didn’t care enough about such a fundamental question to cast a vote), and merely voting for which set of politicians you want to run the country for the next five years. There will be people who turned out in the Brexit referendum or the indyref who will never vote in a run of the mill GE.

  23. ‘There will be people who turned out in the Brexit referendum or the indyref who will never vote in a run of the mill GE.’

    Indeed – some have speculated that it was the high turn out in the EU referendum that tilted it to Leave, with unexpectedly high turn outs in a number of council estates – a point Iain Duncan Smith made on TV as the votes were being counted and as the ‘experts’ – including Nigel Farage – were telling us Remain would win

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