London European Region

2014 Election
2014 Results
1. Claude Moraes (Labour) 806959 36.7% (+15.4%)
2. Syed Kamall (Conservative) 495639 22.5% (-4.8%)
3. Mary Honeyball (Labour) (403480)
4. Gerard Batten (UKIP) 371133 16.9% (+6.1%)
5. Lucy Anderson (Labour) (268986)
6. Charles Tannock (Conservative) (247820)
7. Seb Dance (Labour) (201740)
8. Jean Lambert (Green) 196419 8.9% (-2%)
. (Liberal Democrat) 148013 6.7% (-7%)
. (4 Freedoms) 28014 1.3% (n/a)
. (Independence from Europe) 26675 1.2% (n/a)
. (Christian Peoples Alliance) 23702 1.1% (-1.9%)
. (National Health Action) 23253 1.1% (n/a)
. (Animal Welfare) 21092 1% (n/a)
. (BNP) 19246 0.9% (-4.1%)
. (Europeans) 10712 0.5% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 10142 0.5% (-0.9%)
. (Communities United) 6951 0.3% (n/a)
. (National Liberal) 6736 0.3% (n/a)
. (No2EU) 3804 0.2% (n/a)
. (Harmony) 1985 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
portrait
Claude Moraes (Labour) Born India. Educated at Dundee University. Prior to his election was director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Syed Kamall (Conservative) Born 1967, London. Educated at Latymer School and Liverpool University. Former business consultant. Contested London assembly elections 2000, West Ham 2001. MEP for London since 2005, succeeding Theresa Villiers upon her election to Parliament.
portrait
Mary Honeyball (Labour) Born 1953, Weymouth. Prior to her election was the General Secretary of the Association of Chief Officers of Probation. MEP for London since 2000, when she succeeded upon the resignation of Pauline Green.
portrait
Gerard Batten (UKIP) Born 1954, London. Former British Telecom salesman. Contested Barking by-election 1994, Harlow 1997, West Ham 2001, Dagenham 2005. Contested London mayoralty 2008. MEP for the London Region since 2004.
portrait
Lucy Anderson (Labour) Trade Union officer. Former Camden councillor. MEP for London since 2014
portrait
Charles Tannock (Conservative) Born 1957, Aldershot. Educated at Bradfield College and Oxford University. Former consultant psychiatrist. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Seb Dance (Labour) Born in London. Charity worker and former special advisor to Sean Woodward. MEP for London since 2014
portrait
Jean Lambert (Green) Born 1950, Orsett. Former teacher. MEP for London since 1999. Principle speaker of the Green party between 1992-1993 and 1998-1999.

Full candidates for the 2014 European election are here.

2009 Election
2009 Results
1. Charles Tannock (Conservative) 479037 27.4% (+0.6%)
2. Claude Moraes (Labour) 372590 21.3% (-3.5%)
3. Sarah Ludford (Liberal Democrat) 240156 13.7% (-1.6%)
4. Syed Kamall (Conservative) (239519)
5. Jean Lambert (Green) 190589 10.9% (+2.5%)
6. Gerard Batten (UKIP) 188440 10.8% (-1.6%)
7. Mary Honeyball (Labour) (186295)
8. Marina Yannakoudakis (Conservative) (159679)
. (BNP) 86420 4.9% (+0.9%)
. (Christian) 51336 2.9% (n/a)
. Jan Jananayagam (Independent) 50014 2.9% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 24477 1.4% (+0.6%)
. (No2EU) 17758 1% (n/a)
. (Socialist Labour) 15306 0.9% (n/a)
. (Libertas) 8444 0.5% (n/a)
. (Jury Team) 7284 0.4% (n/a)
. Steven Cheung (Independent) 4918 0.3% (n/a)
. (Socialist (GB)) 4050 0.2% (n/a)
. (Yes2Europe) 3384 0.2% (-0.2%)
. Sohale Rahman (Independent) 3248 0.2
. Gene Alcantara (Independent) 1972 0.1
. Haroon Saad (Independent) 1603 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
portrait
Charles Tannock (Conservative) Born 1957, Aldershot. Educated at Bradfield College and Oxford University. Former consultant psychiatrist. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Claude Moraes (Labour) Born India. Educated at Dundee University. Prior to his election was director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Sarah Ludford (Liberal Democrat) Born 1951. Former Islington councillor. Life peer since 1997. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Syed Kamall (Conservative) Born 1967, London. Educated at Latymer School and Liverpool University. Former business consultant. Contested London assembly elections 2000, West Ham 2001. MEP for London since 2005, succeeding Theresa Villiers upon her election to Parliament.
portrait
Jean Lambert (Green) Born 1950, Orsett. Former teacher. MEP for London since 1999. Principle speaker of the Green party between 1992-1993 and 1998-1999.
portrait
Gerard Batten (UKIP) Born 1954, London. Former British Telecom salesman. Contested Barking by-election 1994, Harlow 1997, West Ham 2001, Dagenham 2005. Contested London mayoralty 2008. MEP for the London Region since 2004.
portrait
Mary Honeyball (Labour) Born 1953, Weymouth. Prior to her election was the General Secretary of the Association of Chief Officers of Probation. MEP for London since 2000, when she succeeded upon the resignation of Pauline Green.
portrait
Marina Yannakoudakis (Conservative) Born 1956, Paddington. Educated at Brunel University. Barnet councillor 2006-2010. MEP for London since 2009.


.

Comments - 306 Responses on “Europe London”
  1. Well I believe Katie Hopkins endorsed UKIP at the last election. It is also very unfair to associate the majority of the Tory Party with the Hopkins-esque hard right it would be the lazy equivalent me of accusing the majority of Labour of being Seamus Milne-esque hard left. Sure there is a chunk of the Conservative Party which is deeply unpleasant and certainly deserves the label ‘nasty party’ but they are vey much a minority and a shrinking minority at that as the grim reaper whittles down their numbers year upon year. While I doubt the Tories will ever move as far to the centre as Ken Clarke or Anna Soubry they will end up closer to that than to Katie Hopkins or Phillip Davies. Of course if PR comes in the whole point is moot as you will likely get a new ‘Wet Tory’ party anyway.

    As to Rivers’ point about lots of people ‘wanting’ to be Tory voters but can’t at the present time I assume you are referring to people who live in wealthy Liverpool wards like Church and Woolton as well as in Sefton? In your experience what would the Tories have to do or say to fix this problem and can they do it without ripping the rest of their coalition apart? I presume this goes to the heart of why the Tories are doing so badly in most large conurbations except in the really wealthy areas.

  2. Pepps
    “As to Rivers’ point about lots of people ‘wanting’ to be Tory voters but can’t at the present time I assume you are referring to people who live in wealthy Liverpool wards like Church and Woolton as well as in Sefton?”

    Not just there as I’ve said before I’ve been doing a fair bit of campaigning in Warrington South as of late and the sentiment was still very much present there.

    “In your experience what would the Tories have to do or say to fix this problem and can they do it without ripping the rest of their coalition apart?”

    I think it comes in several forms, first clear out the ancient dross like Bone and Leigh or at the very least force them to enter the 21’st century, make them attend seminars on LGBT issues and feminism or something, anything to get them to stop spewing the total crap they come out with from time to time.

    Also there is still the presumption (that polling suggests is even felt by people who vote Tory) that the Conservatives only care about the rich, avoiding brazen tax cuts for the wealthiest and privatisations that the public clearly oppose is certainly one way to help.

    Also the Tories really do need to find a way to reach out to the public sector many of whom are extremely wealthy but fear the Tories since they seem to presume their just an overpaid quango and the first chance they get the Tories will make them redundant. The most obvious ways of making overtures to the public sector are obviously the most expensive (give them more money) so that might be problematic but I’d say some genuine heartfelt overtures to public sector unions might be the way to go. Treat them as friends not “the enemy within”

  3. And when Screaming Lord Sutch is king of the world I can have a free unicorn…

  4. Maxim
    As unlikely as it is to happen Ruth Davidson as Tory leader would be a terrifying prospect as a Lab supporter. If the Tories united behind her I think she’d be brilliant, even I find her incredibly endearing. the consolation prize is that as PM she’d probably be a very fair and balanced leader.

  5. ‘if Labour capitulates to this political consensus after 2020 then there won’t be a left-wing party in British politics’

    You could have said when Labour were led by Blair – they were barely a Social Democrat party

    In my opinion what Labour really need to do if they do go down to the much predicted Tory landslide in 2020, is to focus on winning back the scores of white working class voters who have deserted them in droves over the past decade and they will only do that by going down a socially conservative root which will be impossible in a party dominated by socially liberal MPs almost exclusively from metropolitan/urban areas

    On so many levels things do look decisively grim for the Labour Party at the moment

  6. RIVERS10 – Tania Mathius ‘a good ‘un”? Ruth Davidson “incredibly endearing”?

    What is wrong with you, man????

  7. I have been looking at the new Conservative marginals in London and do think that Labour could repeat their 2015 performance here. Remain London is likely to swing against the likely Lab to Con swing in the UK as a whole.

    I believe that Enfield, Merton & Wimbledon Central, Croydon Central and Hendon could all fall. I also think that the results in the semi notional Conservative marginals of Harrow & Stanmore, Hampstead & Golders Green and Brentford & Chiswick could all much closer than the notional majority.

    Future gentrification in Hammersmith & Fulham will sustain the notional Conservative majority there and Labour are being built out of Battersea as 1000’s of new Tories will be occupying Nine Elms by 2020.

    The strong Labour performance in West Central last year, however, and the high number of Remain voters will mean that The Cities of London & Westminster and Kensington & Chelsea could be relegated from ultra safe Conservative seats to being semi-safe Conservative seats. They will become less strong constituencies for the Conservatives than somewhere like Kettering, so gone are the days of Kensington South and its successors being the safest Conservative seat anywhere.

    While they are semi marginal, the Leave vote was stronger in Erith & Crayford and Hillingdon & Uxbridge so I would not see these seats at being at any risk of falling to Labour.

    The new notional marginals of Kenton and Finchley & Southgate would be strong Conservative prospects if outside London, but within London I would expect Labour to comfortably increase the notional majorities.

    On paper, Bermondsey & Waterloo, Twickenham and Kingston & Surbiton should be the most obvious Lib Dem targets but there could be an impact of the loss of the Lib Dem incumbency and the gain for the Conservatives of 5 years of their incumbent.

    We will not know for certain what the trend will be in London until the London Borough elections in May 2019.

  8. @Dalek

    What makes you think that “1000’s of new Tories will be occupying Nine Elms by 2020”? Those new homes could just as easily be snapped up by overseas investors who are not eligible to vote. Even if they rent them out, I highly doubt every occupant will be a Tory. I don’t disagree that Battersea will become harder for Labour but for you to make a blanket statement like that is just nonsense. Unlike you, I actually live in New Elms so I know exactly what’s going on around here.

  9. The only notional Labour marginals (Con 2nd) are Kenton and Finchley & Southgate. I don’t see the Conservatives gaining these but I could see Labour gaining Enfield, Hendon, Merton & Wimbledon Central and Croydon Central despite heavy loses outside London. I think the Conservatives will poll more strongly than 2015 in Leave constituencies but more poorly in Remain constituencies.

  10. Merton & WimbledonCentral…Kenton…hardly the most important part of Harrow….when I see the ghastly new names and proposals, I wonder if the boundary changes will actually happen. But I suppose the discrepancy between electorate sizes can’t be left indefinitely.

  11. Part in Brent part in Harrow.

  12. There’s a poll in today’s Standard:

    Lab: 37%
    Con: 34%
    LD: 14%
    UKIP: 9%
    Green: 5%

    If true the Lib Dems have doubled their vote in London in the last two years (Brexit obviously beeing a big factor).

  13. No surprises here – compared to 2015/16 Labour down quite a bit, Tories static, LDs recovering (but not to pre-2010 levels), UKIP down. There are quite a lot of Lab seats with small majorities in London, so even this sort of swing, smaller than national polls, could be very damaging.

  14. And then, of course, there’s Richmond and whether the Lib Dems can consolidate their byelection gain in a seat they held fairly recently

  15. It’s about the same the national swing is 4% this is 3%

  16. New YouGov poll finds support for a burqa ban in all regions outside of London, including support for a ban in Scotland.

  17. https://www.standard.co.uk/news/politics/theresa-may-could-lose-in-three-of-her-flagship-london-boroughs-a3772026.html

    Relatively unsurprising findings – if anything, I’m pretty impressed that the implied vote share for the Conservatives is up slightly from 2014, even if they are coming from a very low base.

  18. The Evening Standard poll today shows a 3% swing from Con to Lab since the London Borough Council Elections in 2014.

    I would expect this swing to be even greater in strong Remain boroughs like Westminster, Wandsworth and RBKC.

  19. One thing that should be borne in mind is that at these elections, unlike the general election, European citizens can vote. And their turnout will surely be *far* higher than it was in 2014, because they are angry and this is the first time those people will be able to express that anger at the ballot box.

  20. Can you link me. I can only find polls on favourability ratings

  21. Okay, it’s not polling, it’s more anecdotal evidence, but this is worth reading (and do it quickly before the NS disappears behind a paywall):

    https://www.newstatesman.com/politics/brexit/2018/02/they-voted-against-our-rights-will-eu-citizens-punish-labour-local-elections

    Surprisingly, they are as angry at Labour as they are at the Tories.

  22. Really interesting but where’s the bit about the 3% swing?

  23. I’ve never found European citizens to be particularly interested in our local elections. Sometimes they dont know they can vote but I guess our local elections are even less interesting to them than they are too us. Tbf I’ve met a few Germans who are very interested

  24. https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/04/red-london-labour-is-poised-to-take-the-capital/

    The most interesting part of this article is the suggestion that Tories in London could split from the national party. I don’t know how different a hypothetical London Conservatives would be from the rest of the party – invariably it would be little more than a rebranding, most likely in the image of the Evening Standard’s editorial line, at least until City Hall gets stronger powers that allow for radical policymaking.

    In that latter scenario, one idea that springs to mind from a Tory standpoint is the abolition of the Planning Act and/or introducing a land value tax, as market-oriented proposals for tackling the housing shortage.

  25. EU2019 in UK looks like going ahead. The BREXIT PARTY have been getting some good polling figures including this eyecatching one from YOUGOV yesterday

    Brexit Party – 27%
    Labour – 22%
    Con – 15%
    Green – 10%
    Lib Dem – 9%
    UKIP – 7%
    Change UK – 6%
    SNP/Plaid – 4%
    Other – 1%

  26. PT – the only study I’m aware of showed that just 2% of EU electors registered actually voted in the locals here.

    Which even in the low turnout city of Liverpool was 5 – 10 times less likely to vote than UK Nationals.

  27. Lists announced so far

    Conservatives

    1. Syed Kamall MEP
    2. Charles Tannock MEP
    3. Joy Morrissey
    4. Timothy Barnes
    5. Scott Pattenden
    6. Attic Rahman
    7. Kirsty Finlayson
    8. Luke Parker

    Labour

    1 .Claude Moraes MEP
    2. Seb Dance MEP
    3. Katy Clark (former North Ayrshire MP, former political secretary to Corbyn)
    4. Laura Parker (Momentum’s national coordinator)
    5. Murad Qureshi
    6. Taranjit Chana
    7. James Beckles
    8. Sanchia Alasia

    Liberal Democrats

    1. Irina von Wiese (a “lawyer and civil right activist” from Hammersmith & Fulham)
    2. Dinesh Dhamija
    3. Luisa Porritt
    4. Jonathan Fryer
    5. Hussain Khan
    6. Helen Cross
    7. Graham Colley
    8. Rabina Khan

    Greens

    1. Scott Ainslie (Lambeth Cllr)
    2. Gulnar Hasnain
    3. Shahrar Ali
    4. Rachel Collinson
    5. Eleanor Margolies
    6. Remco van der Stoep
    7. Kirsten de Keyser
    8. Peter Underwood

    UKIP

    1. Gerard Batten MEP
    2. Richard Braine
    3. Peter Muswell
    4. Freddy Vachha
    5. Peter McIlvenna
    6. Robert Stephenson
    7. John Poynton
    8. Ronie Johnson

    Brexit Party and ChUK have still to announce their full lists

    Retiring: Jean Lambert (Greens, serving as MEP since 1999), Mary Honeyball (Labour, serving as MEP since 2000), Lucy Anderson (Labour, serving as MEP since 2014)

  28. If I had to guess: Lab 3, one seat each for Con, LD, Green, CHUK and The Brexit Party.

  29. Labour had four MEPs on 36% in London. I’d guess Labours share in London would go up in London on 2014

  30. Labour was briefing that they can lose the 4th seat. Hence the intra-left battle for the third place in the list (party officials over-ruled the NEC selection panel who put Parker third over Clark).

  31. In that case give Labou four seats and take away CHUK’s.

  32. This calculator is useful

    https://icon.cat/util/elections#

    It suggests that, with 8 seats as in London, CHUK and the LDs would need between 9-11% to get a single seat under the d’Hondt system.

    In my own region of South East there are 10 seats and they would need 7-9% to get a single seat.

    Remainers need to be careful to use their votes as effectively as the Leave side. For example if CHUK and LD each gets 9% in London that might still result in neither getting a single seat.

    It’s a tricky chicken-and-egg situation. Ideally I will vote CHUK but if their support in the south east looks too low to get a seat I will switch to LD….if both look unlikely to win a seat then very reluctantly I will vote Labour.

  33. HH- will this be the first time you have voted for a non Conservative candidate in any election?

    I agree with everyone above that both the locals and European elections are tough to call at this stage with both the Leave and Remain vote splitting all over the place.

  34. CHUK London list

    Gavin Esler
    Jan Vincent-Rostowski
    Carol Tongue
    Annabel Mullin
    Karen Newman
    Ali Sadjady Naiery
    Nora Mulready
    Jessica Simor

  35. “HH- will this be the first time you have voted for a non Conservative candidate in any election?”

    I voted for Ken Livingstone in 2008….like so often in life my initial impression of Boris was the right one, to my eternal regret I gave him the benefit of the doubt in 2012 when Ken looked like he had gone mad.

    I voted Lib Dem in a council election in 1995 when only they and Labour were standing candidates.

    Other than that I’ve always either voted Tory or abstained, I’ve only abstained in one GE (2005) due to living overseas.

  36. I have to say, the final straw for me has been the government’s behaviour after the long (or medium-long) extension was granted.

    We were clearly told by the EU “please use this extension for something useful”…by implication a referendum or GE.

    May has ignored this and reverted to can kicking and flogging her dead horse of a deal to the exclusion of all else, whilst the entirety of parliament has been allowed to swan off on holiday. It is extraordinary bad faith and frankly a disgrace…..it does however show that the EU’s statements on the finality of the cliff edge are as meaningless as May’s. We will be stuck in this limbo potentially for years.

  37. FWIW I will also currently be voting for CHUK in my East of England region. I also currently intend to vote for the Green Party in local elections, which is not something I thought I would ever be saying (and would probably cause EcoWirral to choke on his coffee if he still lurks here!) But I can’t bring myself to support either the national Conservative government or the local Lab/LD council, which doesn’t leave me with many options…

  38. Inadvertently you raise another key point. Most councils up this time are Tory controlled and have been for a long time….they are taking the blame for service cuts and overdevelopment. My council in Mid Sussex is typical in this regard and I expect many residents to think “it’s time for a change” on the council even if they would vote differently in a GE.

    I do expect the Lib Dems to do much better than expected and this might be a springboard for them heading into the Euros and a potential GE.

  39. The problem with the Tories is that they have, over the last three years, retreated ever further into a core vote strategy – and now The Brexit Party is eating into that core, leaving them with very few people left prepared to vote for them.

  40. What is about the CUK candidates in Eastern region that appeals to you?

    I know you are deeply unhappy with the direction of the Labour Party but Alex Mayer is the only MEP in Eastern region that does owt. Ive not seen the rest or know who they are. I would be deeply disappointed to see her go and be left with half dozen people who take 150k and do nothing

    In the locals you can spoil your ballot but are the libdem Labour Council that bad?

  41. I agree though the Tories are being hollowed out but even without the Brexit party. Its quite amazing how the 2 party system has collapsed and yet there is no obvious alternative

  42. Here is a repeat of my post on the Europe South West thread:

    Stephen Dorrell, Gavin Esler and Rachel Johnson we all obviously know (or most of us; some of the younger posters may not know Stephen Dorrell, who was Health Secretary under John Major). Jon Owen Jones was MP for Cardiff Central, having gained the seat in 1992, Carole Tongue was a Labour MEP for London, Neil Carmichael the Conservative MP for Stroud, and Roger Casale the Labour MP for Wimbledon from 1997 to 2005. The rest I haven’t heard of.

    However, Warren Morgan sounds familiar. Matt: is he the ex-leader of Brighton and Hove City Council? If so, that is rather worrying. Brighton and Hove Labour Party has been taken over by Momentum, and as I understand it, was forced out of the leadership. He had been quite critical of David Cameron’s government. I know Joan Ryan had been a Minister in Tony Blair’s government, and Chuka Umunna and Chris Leslie were in Ed Miliband’s Shadow Cabinet, but to go from being a council leader to joining a new party in just a few months is quite a step.

    Andrea has confirmed that Warren Morgan is the ex-leader of Brighton and Hove City Council. Wow, CUK does cover quite a wide range from Right to Left, doesn’t it?

    HH: I face the same difficulty as you. I want to vote CUK, but I don’t know whether voting Liberal Democrat might be a better choice in London. I do so wish CUK and the Liberal Democrats had agreed to run joint lists, even if the Greens didn’t join in.

    Regarding the local elections, the last of these ones were on the same day as the 2015 General Election. As you know, Mid Sussex ended up with the Conservatives winning all 54 seats (even including Haywards Heath Bentswood), which is never a good thing, whichever party is in control. I have come round to feeling we need PR for General Elections (I voted against AV in 2011), but I feel we definitely need it in local elections. My mother’s district council, Wealden, is almost as solidly Conservative. I would expect gains for the other parties in both; I expect the Greens to win Forest Row, where a large area, including ours has been moved to a new ward, Danehill and Fletching, which is largely rural. Will you be voting in the local elections?

  43. Tristan, if you are interested, I voted for Simon Hughes in the Mayor of London election in 2004. I thought Steve Norris would finish second, so I felt I could split my votes (I gave Norris my second choice vote). I only voted for Boris as first choice in 2012, and then only because Labour picked Ken Livingstone again. Had they chosen Oona King, I was planning to vote for her.

  44. Warren Morgan is indeed the former leader of B&H council. It’s no surprise. He announced his departure several months ago and now sits as an independent. He and another independent still support Labour in the chamber

  45. Matt: This doesn’t apply to the East region specifically, but I have spotted a few names on the MEP lists of ordinary people, political but not political activists, whom I follow on Twitter and whose musings I agree with nine times out of ten. To see those people inspired to get involved and make a difference – Well, it gives me a warm fuzzy feeling inside. I know I should be more rational than this and apply serious scrutiny to policies, but 99% of the country will be casting emotionally-charged votes, can you not let me off on this one?

  46. On a slightly more serious note, I don’t know what parliamentary grouping CHUK’s MEPs will sit in when they get to Brussels, but it seems the EPP is most likely. And I have often felt like the likes of the CDU probably represent my views better than any British political party.

  47. The EPP parties acorss europe are mostly moving into less statist more socially conservative direction.

  48. “I know you are deeply unhappy with the direction of the Labour Party but Alex Mayer is the only MEP in Eastern region that does owt. Ive not seen the rest or know who they are. I would be deeply disappointed to see her go and be left with half dozen people who take 150k and do nothing”

    Let me introduce you to the concept of voting on national issues and not being all that bothered about individual candidates….90% of the public vote this way and probably even more so at the moment. Yes it’s tough on good people who get swept out with the chaff, but twas ever thus (see Tories in 1997 for details).

    “My mother’s district council, Wealden, is almost as solidly Conservative. I would expect gains for the other parties in both; I expect the Greens to win Forest Row, where a large area, including ours has been moved to a new ward, Danehill and Fletching, which is largely rural. Will you be voting in the local elections?”

    Yes I will. Interestingly we have a slate of independents standing in East Grinstead but their election leaflet says nothing about their policies other than platitudes about “standing up for the town” and so on. I feel I need to research them a bit further….otherwise my vote will probably go Lib Dem in the locals.

    Driving up from Lewes the other day through the Wealden seat there were Green poster literally everywhere. Though most concentrated at the Lewes end and, as you say, in Forest Row just before the West Sussex boundary. Forest Row has always been a hippyish kind of place and I’ve little doubt the Greens will win it back in the current environment.

  49. London EU Poll
    Labour- 24 – 2 seats
    Brexit- 20 – 2 Seats
    Lib Dems- 17 – 2 Seats
    Green- 14 – 1 Seat
    Tory- 10- 1 Seat
    CHUK – 7 – 0 seats

    Westminster
    Labour- 35
    Tory – 23
    Lib Dems – 21
    Brexit – 10
    Green – 7
    CHUK – 2.

    At this rate Brexit Party could come top in London – which even on a lowish share would be extremely symbolic.

Leave a Reply

NB: Before commenting please make sure you are familiar with the Comments Policy. UKPollingReport is a site for non-partisan discussion of polls.

You are not currently logged into UKPollingReport. Registration is not compulsory, but is strongly encouraged. Either login here, or register here (commenters who have previously registered on the Constituency Guide section of the site *should* be able to use their existing login)