London European Region

2014 Election
2014 Results
1. Claude Moraes (Labour) 806959 36.7% (+15.4%)
2. Syed Kamall (Conservative) 495639 22.5% (-4.8%)
3. Mary Honeyball (Labour) (403480)
4. Gerard Batten (UKIP) 371133 16.9% (+6.1%)
5. Lucy Anderson (Labour) (268986)
6. Charles Tannock (Conservative) (247820)
7. Seb Dance (Labour) (201740)
8. Jean Lambert (Green) 196419 8.9% (-2%)
. (Liberal Democrat) 148013 6.7% (-7%)
. (4 Freedoms) 28014 1.3% (n/a)
. (Independence from Europe) 26675 1.2% (n/a)
. (Christian Peoples Alliance) 23702 1.1% (-1.9%)
. (National Health Action) 23253 1.1% (n/a)
. (Animal Welfare) 21092 1% (n/a)
. (BNP) 19246 0.9% (-4.1%)
. (Europeans) 10712 0.5% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 10142 0.5% (-0.9%)
. (Communities United) 6951 0.3% (n/a)
. (National Liberal) 6736 0.3% (n/a)
. (No2EU) 3804 0.2% (n/a)
. (Harmony) 1985 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
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Claude Moraes (Labour) Born India. Educated at Dundee University. Prior to his election was director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Syed Kamall (Conservative) Born 1967, London. Educated at Latymer School and Liverpool University. Former business consultant. Contested London assembly elections 2000, West Ham 2001. MEP for London since 2005, succeeding Theresa Villiers upon her election to Parliament.
portrait
Mary Honeyball (Labour) Born 1953, Weymouth. Prior to her election was the General Secretary of the Association of Chief Officers of Probation. MEP for London since 2000, when she succeeded upon the resignation of Pauline Green.
portrait
Gerard Batten (UKIP) Born 1954, London. Former British Telecom salesman. Contested Barking by-election 1994, Harlow 1997, West Ham 2001, Dagenham 2005. Contested London mayoralty 2008. MEP for the London Region since 2004.
portrait
Lucy Anderson (Labour) Trade Union officer. Former Camden councillor. MEP for London since 2014
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Charles Tannock (Conservative) Born 1957, Aldershot. Educated at Bradfield College and Oxford University. Former consultant psychiatrist. MEP for London since 1999.
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Seb Dance (Labour) Born in London. Charity worker and former special advisor to Sean Woodward. MEP for London since 2014
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Jean Lambert (Green) Born 1950, Orsett. Former teacher. MEP for London since 1999. Principle speaker of the Green party between 1992-1993 and 1998-1999.

Full candidates for the 2014 European election are here.

2009 Election
2009 Results
1. Charles Tannock (Conservative) 479037 27.4% (+0.6%)
2. Claude Moraes (Labour) 372590 21.3% (-3.5%)
3. Sarah Ludford (Liberal Democrat) 240156 13.7% (-1.6%)
4. Syed Kamall (Conservative) (239519)
5. Jean Lambert (Green) 190589 10.9% (+2.5%)
6. Gerard Batten (UKIP) 188440 10.8% (-1.6%)
7. Mary Honeyball (Labour) (186295)
8. Marina Yannakoudakis (Conservative) (159679)
. (BNP) 86420 4.9% (+0.9%)
. (Christian) 51336 2.9% (n/a)
. Jan Jananayagam (Independent) 50014 2.9% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 24477 1.4% (+0.6%)
. (No2EU) 17758 1% (n/a)
. (Socialist Labour) 15306 0.9% (n/a)
. (Libertas) 8444 0.5% (n/a)
. (Jury Team) 7284 0.4% (n/a)
. Steven Cheung (Independent) 4918 0.3% (n/a)
. (Socialist (GB)) 4050 0.2% (n/a)
. (Yes2Europe) 3384 0.2% (-0.2%)
. Sohale Rahman (Independent) 3248 0.2
. Gene Alcantara (Independent) 1972 0.1
. Haroon Saad (Independent) 1603 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
portrait
Charles Tannock (Conservative) Born 1957, Aldershot. Educated at Bradfield College and Oxford University. Former consultant psychiatrist. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Claude Moraes (Labour) Born India. Educated at Dundee University. Prior to his election was director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Sarah Ludford (Liberal Democrat) Born 1951. Former Islington councillor. Life peer since 1997. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Syed Kamall (Conservative) Born 1967, London. Educated at Latymer School and Liverpool University. Former business consultant. Contested London assembly elections 2000, West Ham 2001. MEP for London since 2005, succeeding Theresa Villiers upon her election to Parliament.
portrait
Jean Lambert (Green) Born 1950, Orsett. Former teacher. MEP for London since 1999. Principle speaker of the Green party between 1992-1993 and 1998-1999.
portrait
Gerard Batten (UKIP) Born 1954, London. Former British Telecom salesman. Contested Barking by-election 1994, Harlow 1997, West Ham 2001, Dagenham 2005. Contested London mayoralty 2008. MEP for the London Region since 2004.
portrait
Mary Honeyball (Labour) Born 1953, Weymouth. Prior to her election was the General Secretary of the Association of Chief Officers of Probation. MEP for London since 2000, when she succeeded upon the resignation of Pauline Green.
portrait
Marina Yannakoudakis (Conservative) Born 1956, Paddington. Educated at Brunel University. Barnet councillor 2006-2010. MEP for London since 2009.


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Comments - 265 Responses on “Europe London”
  1. To quote 111 upthread… “I expect that UKIP will do well in London next week based on a coalition of eurosceptics, religious types, prosperous commonwealth second generation immigrants (Indian restaurant owners etc), socially conservative Tories, WWC people, and protest voters who will tactically vote UKIP to scare the Tories.”

    Well I said you were “having a laugh” and something tells me we won’t be hearing from you again for a long while.

  2. Agree that something needs to be done about Tower Hamlets. If it’s really, really close next year, we could end up with the ludicrous situation that the final outcome (or coalition forming) is held up by some compact, low turnout constituencies just down the river from Westminster.

  3. To be fair, most people were under few illusions about how UKIP would do in London. A young, cosmopolitan city is hardly going to vote for a party emphasising tradition and national borders. All it shows is how fundamentally different London (and its immediate hinterland) is from the rest of England.

  4. From Moe Lester a few days ago : Certainly Labour will not poll anything like 37 (late 20s I’d expect).
    Looks like the polls were more accurate than Mr Lester or whatever his real name is.

  5. Everyone should have taken 111s predictions with a pinch of salt- at one point he claimed that UKIP would get 50% in one region which was never going to happen..

    I am slightly suprised that UKIP didn’t do better in London and based on opinion polls and predictions I am shocked they didn’t get above 30% nationally but they still managed a exceptionally good result

  6. Whilst this is undoubtedly a spectacular day for UKIP, beyond my expectations, both the Conservatives and Labour can draw some positives. The Conservatives held up rather well in some regions, and of course weren’t so far off coming second in the popular vote, which is all very encouraging for next year. As for my party, Labour did well in the North (wasn’t expecting 2 seats in the NE), and London has undoubtedly been a very good set of results for us, both locally and on a European level. London will be our most positive draw out of this campaign season. Our progress in other regions, however, was pretty anaemic.

    For the Liberal Democrats, there are no positives. This has been a bloodbath. Us serious observers of the polls knew talk of a wipeout was overblown, but only the Lib Dems could push themselves so close to one as they did. Only 1 MEP left will stoke fires on these leadership rumblings.

  7. Well, yes, Barnaby, guess I was way off the mark in London! I also completely underestimated the demise of the Lib Dems and BNP.

    I did though at least win the bet I put on – that the Tories would exceed 14 seats, so not a bad night from my point of view..

  8. I’ve heard tell that the one Lib Dem MEP only held her seat by sixteen votes.

  9. ^Labour’s NW performance was encouraging as well. Of course the can point to Manchester or Liverpool for that. Think their vote held up in Wirral and Warrington too. Haven’t seen breakdown for other authorities.

  10. I did hear the same thing with the BBC coverage last night, but it was someone misspeaking. In reality, I think the margin was more like 10,000.

  11. In the context of a general election the Euro elections mean nothing. The locals are of much more interest and importance. As you say, the key trend was of a strong Labour performance in London balanced out by a lacklustre result outside of London (from the midlands south, at least). I very much think that will be the story of 2015 and it will be enough to put Miliband into no.10 in some way or another, though probably short of a majority.

    Incidentally it’s ironic, given how the BBC is often chided for its “right wing bias”, how the media has unfairly characterised Labour’s local election performance as some kind of disaster. In London in particular, it was quite clearly a harbinger of doom for Cameron’s overall prospects in 2015.

  12. ‘Labour’s NW performance was encouraging as well’

    Indeed, that’s what I meant by the North. Both NW and NE.

  13. As for London, Tower Hamlets is becoming like the Venezuela of England. What a shambolic load of bollocks they put the rest of London through with their pathetic time management. And a mayor who when scrutinised, the Trots leap to his defence.

  14. “And a mayor who when scrutinised, the Trots leap to his defence.”

    I thought you were talking about Ken Livingstone for a minute!

    Unless the demographic changes are massively slowed down by the sectarian mess that is TH council, much of the mayor’s core support base will have moved out of the borough in a couple of years’ time.

    It will be interesting to see if a new Tower Hamlets emerges in the coming years in somewhere like Newham or Ilford.

  15. As if Newham isn’t rotten enough…

  16. “I don’t disagree with you, but there are a large number of EU nationals in London who will have voted in these elections but won’t be able to in a general election”

    There are lots of Eastern Europeans in Rotherham and Doncaster but that didn’t stop UKIP winning there.

  17. What was picked up on the programme is how there are “two Londons”…while most of it was stony ground for UKIP, some of it, particularly on the Kent border, was much stronger, particularly Bromley, which is Farage’s home Borough (despite the fact he represents South East).

    If anyone’s interested, the results by Borough are here:

    http://londoneuroelections.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Borough-Voting-Figures-for-London-160KB-pdf.pdf

  18. “What was picked up on the programme is how there are “two Londons””

    Yes but the size of the “second London” is tiny relative to the size of the first.

    It was a trend mirrored in the local elections too, with the Tories maintaining or even increasing their vote share in many wards in Bexley, Bromley and South Croydon despite UKIP doing well. But these areas are a drop in the ocean compared with the size of the rest of London.

    As Richard has intimated, there was also a “third London” – rapidly gentrifying areas where the Tories nevertheless continue to experience a falling vote share

  19. Notable how close to the tories labour were in Wandsworth.

  20. In the Euros presumably? The Tories did pretty well in the locals in both Battersea and Putney, and not all that badly in Tooting either though Labour did re-establish a clear lead there.

  21. Labour were only 1,072 votes away from topping the poll in City of Westminster combined with strong performance in locals Karen Buck is safe.

  22. Labour are pretty safe in London in general. They should gain Brentford, Enfield North, Hornsey and Wood Green and Brent Central easily.

    Croydon Central and Harrow East both look very tight and of course Southgate looks like an outside bet, as does Bermondsey.

    Miliband and his policies are a far better match to the London electorate than to the rest of country.

  23. Actually the Tories were less far ahead compared with 2010 in Battersea and Putney and they lost councillors in both.

  24. “Actually the Tories were less far ahead compared with 2010 in Battersea and Putney and they lost councillors in both.”

    Well obviously yes, that was the case almost everywhere given that in 2010 Labour were 8% behind nationally whilst they were 2% ahead this year (5% swing from Con to Lab nationally, higher in London).

    Battersea results in 2014 were as follows (aggregate of all local election votes)

    Con 51.1 (+0.3)
    Lab 34.6 (+6.1)
    Grn 6.4
    LD 5.0 (-11.3)
    UKIP 2.3

    Swing Con to Lab 2.9%, compared with ~5% nationally and more in London

    I didn’t do the figures for Putney yet

    Note the Tory vote in Battersea not only remained above 50%, it slightly increased.

  25. Here’s Putney

    Con 51.3 (-2.3)
    Lab 29.9 (+4.9)
    LD 9.0 (-8.5)
    Grn 5.8
    UKIP 2.5

    Swing Con to Lab 3.6% – higher than Battersea but still far below average

  26. I would take issue with the description of Newham as rotten. It isn’t the greatest place to live in Britain, but it is governed generally with reasonable effectiveness & competence, especially given that there has been no opposition for over 4 years. The basic council services are not administered or operated any worse than in many other council areas of various political persuasion.

  27. Just one more thing – Sarah Ludford 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Sorry couldn’t resist that.

  28. Rotten is overused and a lot of exaggeration. Tower Hamlets service delivery s generally good. Its a 3 star council with the most improved schools in UK even Gilligan acknowledges thats not the issue rather its the politics and infighting.

  29. I was in London last weekend (9 April) and saw a Remain canvasser handing out leaflets outside South Kensington tube station. To me, this symbolises how much they are not in touch with ordinary electors.

  30. Ermm is that the 50% of ‘ordinary’ electors who are telling the pollsters that they will vote remain?

  31. Am I missing something here, or do people who use South Kensington tube station not get a vote in the EU referendum?

  32. A very considerable proportion of the people using South Kensington station are non-EU residents visiting London (or on occasion using tax havens to own houses in the area).

  33. According to this, South Kensington station has 36 million passengers passing through it every year.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Kensington_tube_station

    I do wonder how many of those really are non-EU residents visiting London and/or using tax havens to own houses in the area.
    🙂

  34. Once again it should be pointed out that this isn’t going to be decided by an electoral college, so making sure eligible Remain voters in Kensington turn out (and convincing those waverers that do obviously exist) is as important as some marginal area.

  35. Currently raining in much of London. May reduce turnout and possibly impact on the final vote. Turnout has been reported high in some parts of my city ( such as Richmond, Wandsworth and Islington) but is said to be lower in Tower Hamlets and Newham( when I voted earlier the polling clerk said it been emply).

  36. FS – ha very true. Simon – I’d imagine at least half probably aren’t eligible, no.

    It reminds me of some hapless young Tory helpers (they may have been for Amber Rudd or Tony Caldera), flyering commuters [because that’s what they saw happen in London] on Polling Day at Lpool Moorfields at 5-6pm – but by definition 90% of those people were getting trains home to Ormskirk (W Lancs), Wallasey or West Kirby (Wirral), Southport (Sefton), Kirkby or Hunts Cross (Knowsley) or Ellesmere Port (Cheshire West & C).

  37. Currently bored waiting for the results so trying to think of who has come out of this campaign with the most credit.

    As much as he infuriates me, Sadiq Khan springs to mind. In fact I’m quite glad he is ‘stuck’ as mayor until after the next election – he could become a formidable leader. He comes across well and could possibly unite the various strands of the party. But maybe the shine will wear off a bit after a term or 2 as mayor……

  38. Ruth Davidson? Seems to me that Nicola Sturgeon has no love or care for Europe, but only campaigned for a Remain vote to the advantage of the SNP in the long run and to provoke a Leave vote in England.

  39. I’d definitely say Ruth Davidson, so much so that I believe (however improbable it is) that she would be the best pick for next Tory leader. Ruth seems to have real cut through with demographics that aren’t normally friendly to the Tories. I personally know many of my student friends who love her and even I have a soft spot for her. It would be hard to peg the Tories as the nasty party when their leader is a charming, cheery, Scottish lesbian.

  40. Andrea Leadsom has had a good campaign for the Leave side- one to watch in a future Cabinet reshuffle and what I hope is an imminent Conservative leadership contest.

  41. Rivers 10- I disagree- she is well suited for her current role but her views on Europe alone are enough to make her very problematic for the party at-large.

  42. I’ll also throw Davidson’s name out there. My Scottish grandparents (both of whom are in their mid 80’s, both lifelong socialists and Labour voters) can’t sing her praises highly enough.

    I think Khan has done fairly well although I like him anyway.

    Sturgeon- lacklustre in the extreme. Salmond- surprisingly, somewhat better.

    Cameron- not bad, not great. He at least sounded committed to the cause- which could not be said for Corbyn.

    Jonhson- not bad, not great. Extremely unconvincing start but has somewhat redeemed himself.

    Gove- he’s an articulate man who has performed well in all media appearances. Such a polarising, widely disliked figure though so it’s very hard to work out whether he is simply preaching to the converted or genuinely swaying any votes.

    IDS- solid campaign. Priti Patel- as woeful as you might expect.

    Nick Clegg- who?

  43. Tory
    Oh I agree the Tory party would never pick her and she probably couldn’t control the backbenchers. I’m just saying in a hypothetical scenario where the Tories rallied behind their newly elected leader (however unlikely that is) I believe Ruth would do well.

  44. Oh, and as much as I like Ruth, there is almost no chance for her to be the next leader (for the reason Tory laid out).

  45. I also agree with Tory re: Leadsom. No one has spoken to middle England better than her from the Leave side. Unflappable- to the point where it’s almost a bit scary. Her only low point was the ‘I’m a Mum’ etc nonsense.

  46. Tory leavers seem to be big fans of Leadsom (which may count for something come a leadership election, of course) but I personally found her debate performances annoying. She couldn’t go two sentences without saying ‘take back control’. On Tuesday I thought she was much of the weakest member of the Leave line-up.

  47. Still predicting a Leave win Jack??

  48. @HH

    In truth it is impossible to call with any confidence. But if I had to say I’m still going Leave. I may be proved wrong.

  49. Maxim- nor me. My hope is now for as narrow a Remain win as possible so as to accelerate Cameron’s departure.

  50. It’s only fair that I add that H Hemmelig called matters correctly last Friday.

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