London European Region

2014 Election
2014 Results
1. Claude Moraes (Labour) 806959 36.7% (+15.4%)
2. Syed Kamall (Conservative) 495639 22.5% (-4.8%)
3. Mary Honeyball (Labour) (403480)
4. Gerard Batten (UKIP) 371133 16.9% (+6.1%)
5. Lucy Anderson (Labour) (268986)
6. Charles Tannock (Conservative) (247820)
7. Seb Dance (Labour) (201740)
8. Jean Lambert (Green) 196419 8.9% (-2%)
. (Liberal Democrat) 148013 6.7% (-7%)
. (4 Freedoms) 28014 1.3% (n/a)
. (Independence from Europe) 26675 1.2% (n/a)
. (Christian Peoples Alliance) 23702 1.1% (-1.9%)
. (National Health Action) 23253 1.1% (n/a)
. (Animal Welfare) 21092 1% (n/a)
. (BNP) 19246 0.9% (-4.1%)
. (Europeans) 10712 0.5% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 10142 0.5% (-0.9%)
. (Communities United) 6951 0.3% (n/a)
. (National Liberal) 6736 0.3% (n/a)
. (No2EU) 3804 0.2% (n/a)
. (Harmony) 1985 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
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Claude Moraes (Labour) Born India. Educated at Dundee University. Prior to his election was director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants. MEP for London since 1999.
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Syed Kamall (Conservative) Born 1967, London. Educated at Latymer School and Liverpool University. Former business consultant. Contested London assembly elections 2000, West Ham 2001. MEP for London since 2005, succeeding Theresa Villiers upon her election to Parliament.
portrait
Mary Honeyball (Labour) Born 1953, Weymouth. Prior to her election was the General Secretary of the Association of Chief Officers of Probation. MEP for London since 2000, when she succeeded upon the resignation of Pauline Green.
portrait
Gerard Batten (UKIP) Born 1954, London. Former British Telecom salesman. Contested Barking by-election 1994, Harlow 1997, West Ham 2001, Dagenham 2005. Contested London mayoralty 2008. MEP for the London Region since 2004.
portrait
Lucy Anderson (Labour) Trade Union officer. Former Camden councillor. MEP for London since 2014
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Charles Tannock (Conservative) Born 1957, Aldershot. Educated at Bradfield College and Oxford University. Former consultant psychiatrist. MEP for London since 1999.
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Seb Dance (Labour) Born in London. Charity worker and former special advisor to Sean Woodward. MEP for London since 2014
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Jean Lambert (Green) Born 1950, Orsett. Former teacher. MEP for London since 1999. Principle speaker of the Green party between 1992-1993 and 1998-1999.

Full candidates for the 2014 European election are here.

2009 Election
2009 Results
1. Charles Tannock (Conservative) 479037 27.4% (+0.6%)
2. Claude Moraes (Labour) 372590 21.3% (-3.5%)
3. Sarah Ludford (Liberal Democrat) 240156 13.7% (-1.6%)
4. Syed Kamall (Conservative) (239519)
5. Jean Lambert (Green) 190589 10.9% (+2.5%)
6. Gerard Batten (UKIP) 188440 10.8% (-1.6%)
7. Mary Honeyball (Labour) (186295)
8. Marina Yannakoudakis (Conservative) (159679)
. (BNP) 86420 4.9% (+0.9%)
. (Christian) 51336 2.9% (n/a)
. Jan Jananayagam (Independent) 50014 2.9% (n/a)
. (English Democrats) 24477 1.4% (+0.6%)
. (No2EU) 17758 1% (n/a)
. (Socialist Labour) 15306 0.9% (n/a)
. (Libertas) 8444 0.5% (n/a)
. (Jury Team) 7284 0.4% (n/a)
. Steven Cheung (Independent) 4918 0.3% (n/a)
. (Socialist (GB)) 4050 0.2% (n/a)
. (Yes2Europe) 3384 0.2% (-0.2%)
. Sohale Rahman (Independent) 3248 0.2
. Gene Alcantara (Independent) 1972 0.1
. Haroon Saad (Independent) 1603 0.1% (n/a)
Current sitting MEPs
portrait
Charles Tannock (Conservative) Born 1957, Aldershot. Educated at Bradfield College and Oxford University. Former consultant psychiatrist. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Claude Moraes (Labour) Born India. Educated at Dundee University. Prior to his election was director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Sarah Ludford (Liberal Democrat) Born 1951. Former Islington councillor. Life peer since 1997. MEP for London since 1999.
portrait
Syed Kamall (Conservative) Born 1967, London. Educated at Latymer School and Liverpool University. Former business consultant. Contested London assembly elections 2000, West Ham 2001. MEP for London since 2005, succeeding Theresa Villiers upon her election to Parliament.
portrait
Jean Lambert (Green) Born 1950, Orsett. Former teacher. MEP for London since 1999. Principle speaker of the Green party between 1992-1993 and 1998-1999.
portrait
Gerard Batten (UKIP) Born 1954, London. Former British Telecom salesman. Contested Barking by-election 1994, Harlow 1997, West Ham 2001, Dagenham 2005. Contested London mayoralty 2008. MEP for the London Region since 2004.
portrait
Mary Honeyball (Labour) Born 1953, Weymouth. Prior to her election was the General Secretary of the Association of Chief Officers of Probation. MEP for London since 2000, when she succeeded upon the resignation of Pauline Green.
portrait
Marina Yannakoudakis (Conservative) Born 1956, Paddington. Educated at Brunel University. Barnet councillor 2006-2010. MEP for London since 2009.


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Comments - 245 Responses on “Europe London”
  1. ‘I find the Croydon proposals interesting, with Croydon Central and Croydon South swapping New Addington and Purley.’

    Interesting is one way of putting it

    Ludicrous would be mine

    The urban estate of New Addington has absolutely nothing in common with the other suburban wards in Croydon South except maybe Waddon, whereas Purely fits neatly into that bracket

    The boundary commision has turned the latest review into a US-style number crunching exercise

  2. ‘The boundary commision has turned the latest review into a US-style number crunching exercise’

    Well, more the government through the legislation than the commission themselves.

  3. Anthony’s notionals have Croydon S Tory by 14,000

  4. In the Commission’s defence New Addington is in the southern part of the borough, so Cental would be geographically faithful as a seat

  5. Tim is right. New Addington is the terminus of the tram line to central Croydon which passes through almost all the wards in the current Croydon Central. There is almost no community link between it and Croydon South, and very poor transport links. It is one of the commission’s stupider decisions this time round.

  6. Have to make up the numbers somehow. Equal sized seats are long overdue

  7. Is it fair to say that New Addington is Croydon’s equivalent of the St Hellier estate in Merton/Sutton?

    It probably would fit better with Central then

    @Robberbutton

    Agree. This has been a long time in coming

  8. “Worth noting that Bishop’s is the Tories’ strongest ward in Vauxhall”

    No it’s not. Clapham Town is the strongest Tory ward in the current Vauxhall seat, and the only one that has (since 1978) elected Tory Councillors.

    In 2014 locals, CT voted 25.5% Tory. Bishop’s was second on 19% but they were in third place.

    Bishop’s was the most pro-Brexit ward in Vauxhall and, indeed, Lambeth (not saying much!) but being Brexiteer and pro-Tory not necessarily the same thing.

  9. Look at EC, I’m pretty sure Bishop’s was the strongest Tory ward in Vauxhall in 2015.

  10. “Is it fair to say that New Addington is Croydon’s equivalent of the St Hellier estate in Merton/Sutton?”

    In some ways yes, but New Addington is rougher. Also it has an isolated/remote feel to it – see my post above – being divided from all directions by a semi-rural area. In contrast St Helier is an integral part of the urban area to the west of Croydon.

  11. True. I’ve never visited either so was curious. I’ve been on the Bedford to Brighton train before so have probably travelled through Croydon N and Croydon C before

  12. In response to an earlier discussion here, Bishop’s was the Tories’ best ward in Vauxhall in 2015:

    Hoey was ahead by 439 votes in Bishop’s in 2015
    Clapham Town by contrast voted Lab by 1,224 votes…

    The next closest wards were Oval and Prince’s:

    Oval went Lab by 1724 votes and Prince’s by 1728

  13. So the addition of Bishop’s to Bermondsey & Old Southwark helps the LDs and should he LDs collapse there without Hughes, the Tories

  14. The only way I see the Tories getting into 2nd place in Bermondsey is if we have some Lib-Lab gov’t in the future. This is probably the only way the Tories will win back North Norfolk, Southport and Carshalton & Wellington, Westmorland etc.

    Surrey Docks in Bermondsey was a 3-way fight in 2015, with the 3rd-placed Tories 768 votes behind Hughes in 1st place

  15. If Hughes stands in the new Bermondsey & Old Southwark I think his chances are pretty good

  16. “True. I’ve never visited either so was curious. I’ve been on the Bedford to Brighton train before so have probably travelled through Croydon N and Croydon C before”

    From that train line you travel through a fair bit of Croydon North and Croydon South, but literally only a few metres of Croydon Central (in the immediate area of East Croydon station).

  17. Ah fair enough. I thought it was Croydon Central didn’t know it was mainly South I was travelling through.

    I think we went through part Dulwich & West Norwood (Herne Hill and West Norwood) also

  18. Oh OK….so you went on the temporary route then. This is just in place whilst London Bridge station is being rebuilt. You go through Croydon South, Croydon Central briefly, Croydon North, Lewisham West & Penge (Crystal Palace), D&WN (Gipsy Hill, West N, Tulse Hill, Herne Hill), probably briefly through Camberwell & Peckham, then Southwark & Bermondsey (Elephant & Castle up to Blackfriars).

  19. Yes I wasn’t so aware of constituencies and such at the times (August 2014 and August 2015) but would probably be more aware now

    Places always look pretty down at heel from the railway in my experience

  20. Ronnie Fearn regained his seat after being out of the Commons for 5 years and Mike Hancock regained his seat after 10 years, so Simon Hughes would have a chance on more favourable boundaries.

  21. The notional result is probably not as close as it would’ve been in reality because in the event I imagine the Tory voters of Bishop’s would have voted tactically like their counterparts in Surrey Docks, so I think if the new Bermondsey boundaries had been used in 2015 the result would’ve been:

    Are Bishop’s and Surrey Docks wards similar in terms of demographics?

  22. But yes the general point is that the addition of Bishop’s is a boon for the LDs

  23. 6.77% majority in Bermondsey should be easy to overturn for Hughes

  24. LDs who could consider a re-run:

    Sir Simon Hughes
    Paul Burstow
    Julian Huppert
    Mike Crockart
    Jo Swinson

    The LDs would also be in strong positions in Twickenham, Eastbourne, Southport and North East Fife

  25. All of the Scottish seats are likely to be significantly less favourable to the Lib Dems post-review.

  26. For what its worth I hope Cable doesn’t try to make another run in Twickenham, his days are probably up and while I used to admire him his time in the coalition led me to kinda despise him. Plus the new Tory MP there Tania Mathias seems like a good un.

  27. He has already said he is running again (in the Evening Std yesterday), ditto Ed Davey.

  28. @H.Hemmelig I think he only said he’d run if May calls a snap election, which is very unlikely to happen. It doesn’t sound like he’s planning on running if the next one is 2020 though when he will be just shy of 77 years old.

  29. ‘From that train line you travel through a fair bit of Croydon North and Croydon South, but literally only a few metres of Croydon Central (in the immediate area of East Croydon station).’

    Croydon Central is a bit of a geographical misnomer as the wards within it are almost entirely from the Eastern part of Croydon and Croydon East would be a more apt name for the seat – although it does contain the bulk of Croydon’s retail and commerce

    On the train line you get to see Northern Croydon in all its glory, from the estates of Thornton Heath, to the low-quality residential terraces around Selhurst and Norbury

    It always makes me scratch my head as to how this was ever a reliably Conservative-voting area

    ‘Hoey was ahead by 439 votes in Bishop’s in 2015
    Clapham Town by contrast voted Lab by 1,224 votes…
    The next closest wards were Oval and Prince’s:
    Oval went Lab by 1724 votes and Prince’s by 1728’

    You don’t want to take too much notice on the ward figures on electoral calculus – they are mostly guesswork at best and pure fiction at worst

  30. ‘For what its worth I hope Cable doesn’t try to make another run in Twickenham, his days are probably up and while I used to admire him his time in the coalition led me to kinda despise him. Plus the new Tory MP there Tania Mathias seems like a good un.’

    I actually thought she was Cable’s wife when they appeared together as the result was announced as they seemed to be so friendly ti each other

    Mathias does seem like an extremely decent lady but you do wonder what somebody who has spent most of their career saving lives in third-world countries sees in a party cheered on by the likes of Runnymead and Katie Hopkins

  31. Tim
    “Mathias does seem like an extremely decent lady but you do wonder what somebody who has spent most of their career saving lives in third-world countries sees in a party cheered on by the likes of Runnymead and Katie Hopkins”

    I do wonder the same thing every so often, I suppose its that old liberal tradition of believing in the merits of free market enterprise but with a healthy dose of compassion and progressiveness thrown in. I’ve said it many times before but if the Tories were made up near exclusively of the likes Mathias, Clarke, Davidson, Wollaston and Soubry they’d be near enough electorally unbeatable. In my relatively short time campaigning the amount of times I’ve came across people who should be voting Tory and probably want to vote Tory but they just can’t bring themselves to cos the “nasty party” image keeps being reinforced by certain figures within the party.

    Obviously in this hypothetical scenario the Tories would probably lose a lot of their ultra conservative and WWC support to UKIP but that would be more than made up for amongst middle class public sector professionals and the liberal minded middle class. but that’s just my opinion.

  32. @Rivers and @Tim Jones

    Surely that’s a good thing – that the party is a broad church and is open enough for people like Peter Bone and Ruth Davidson can both find a home here

    Of course in the Labour Party the moderates can’t work with the Corbynites and look where that’s left them, duking it out in what has become one year-long leadership battle.

    Better to be a broad church imo

  33. ‘I’ve said it many times before but if the Tories were made up near exclusively of the likes Mathias, Clarke, Davidson, Wollaston and Soubry they’d be near enough electorally unbeatable.’

    If they were I’d vote for them without reservation but as Runnymead pointed out himself yesterday, people like that are very much the Tories of yesterday and don’t hold a great deal of clout in today’s party – which is becoming increasingly Republican -esque in its outlook

    I said at the time that one of the worst possible things about a Corbyn-led Labour Party is that the Tories will feel they can get away with almost anything – and we are seeing with the proposed reintroduction if grammar schools – after David Willets’ speech a few years ago everyone was saying the debate is now over, only for May to propose their reintroduction

    As Nick Soames said last night – it would indeed be wonderful if there was a grammar school in those post-industrial towns filled with dire comprehensives BUT we all know the Tories would be far keener in confining them to the affluent and middle class areas they represent – like Altrincham & Sale and Sevenoaks

    With Corbyn almost certain to get re-elected who knows what they might try next – full-scale privitisation of the NHS, abolishing the 20-day holiday entitlement for employees

    Short of him getting elected PM himself, this is why Corbyn is such bad news noyt just for the Labour Party, but for British politics

  34. I think the rise of UKIP has pushed the centre way too the right now

    if Labour capitulates to this political consensus after 2020 then there won’t be a left-wing party in British politics

  35. Well I believe Katie Hopkins endorsed UKIP at the last election. It is also very unfair to associate the majority of the Tory Party with the Hopkins-esque hard right it would be the lazy equivalent me of accusing the majority of Labour of being Seamus Milne-esque hard left. Sure there is a chunk of the Conservative Party which is deeply unpleasant and certainly deserves the label ‘nasty party’ but they are vey much a minority and a shrinking minority at that as the grim reaper whittles down their numbers year upon year. While I doubt the Tories will ever move as far to the centre as Ken Clarke or Anna Soubry they will end up closer to that than to Katie Hopkins or Phillip Davies. Of course if PR comes in the whole point is moot as you will likely get a new ‘Wet Tory’ party anyway.

    As to Rivers’ point about lots of people ‘wanting’ to be Tory voters but can’t at the present time I assume you are referring to people who live in wealthy Liverpool wards like Church and Woolton as well as in Sefton? In your experience what would the Tories have to do or say to fix this problem and can they do it without ripping the rest of their coalition apart? I presume this goes to the heart of why the Tories are doing so badly in most large conurbations except in the really wealthy areas.

  36. @Pepps

    I don’t think the Tories could win back the public sector elite in seats like Sheffield, Hallam and Sefton Central.

    Might as well pick off Labour seats in the former mining areas.

    The Tories don’t need to win in those cities and can’t be all things to all men really, hard to win voters in all seats.

  37. @Tim Jones

    Having seen parts of Croydon North I agree with you, it’s a shithole, but West Norwood and Herne Hill looked ok

  38. Pepps
    “As to Rivers’ point about lots of people ‘wanting’ to be Tory voters but can’t at the present time I assume you are referring to people who live in wealthy Liverpool wards like Church and Woolton as well as in Sefton?”

    Not just there as I’ve said before I’ve been doing a fair bit of campaigning in Warrington South as of late and the sentiment was still very much present there.

    “In your experience what would the Tories have to do or say to fix this problem and can they do it without ripping the rest of their coalition apart?”

    I think it comes in several forms, first clear out the ancient dross like Bone and Leigh or at the very least force them to enter the 21’st century, make them attend seminars on LGBT issues and feminism or something, anything to get them to stop spewing the total crap they come out with from time to time.

    Also there is still the presumption (that polling suggests is even felt by people who vote Tory) that the Conservatives only care about the rich, avoiding brazen tax cuts for the wealthiest and privatisations that the public clearly oppose is certainly one way to help.

    Also the Tories really do need to find a way to reach out to the public sector many of whom are extremely wealthy but fear the Tories since they seem to presume their just an overpaid quango and the first chance they get the Tories will make them redundant. The most obvious ways of making overtures to the public sector are obviously the most expensive (give them more money) so that might be problematic but I’d say some genuine heartfelt overtures to public sector unions might be the way to go. Treat them as friends not “the enemy within”

  39. @Rivers

    When Ruth Davidson is elected as MP for Edinburgh South West and becomes Tory PM then the Tories will win these kinds of people back

  40. With Ruth at the helm the Tories will take back East Renfrewshire; Sheffield, Hallam; Birmingham, Edgbaston; Aberdeen South, Gedling, Wirral South etc.

  41. And when Screaming Lord Sutch is king of the world I can have a free unicorn…

  42. Maxim
    As unlikely as it is to happen Ruth Davidson as Tory leader would be a terrifying prospect as a Lab supporter. If the Tories united behind her I think she’d be brilliant, even I find her incredibly endearing. the consolation prize is that as PM she’d probably be a very fair and balanced leader.

  43. ‘if Labour capitulates to this political consensus after 2020 then there won’t be a left-wing party in British politics’

    You could have said when Labour were led by Blair – they were barely a Social Democrat party

    In my opinion what Labour really need to do if they do go down to the much predicted Tory landslide in 2020, is to focus on winning back the scores of white working class voters who have deserted them in droves over the past decade and they will only do that by going down a socially conservative root which will be impossible in a party dominated by socially liberal MPs almost exclusively from metropolitan/urban areas

    On so many levels things do look decisively grim for the Labour Party at the moment

  44. I think the first thing to do is to win over BME voters in seats like Brent North, Harrow West etc

  45. RIVERS10 – Tania Mathius ‘a good ‘un”? Ruth Davidson “incredibly endearing”?

    What is wrong with you, man????

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