Esher & Walton

2015 Result:
Conservative: 35845 (62.9%)
Labour: 7229 (12.7%)
Lib Dem: 5372 (9.4%)
Green: 2355 (4.1%)
UKIP: 5551 (9.7%)
Independent: 228 (0.4%)
Others: 396 (0.7%)
MAJORITY: 28616 (50.2%)

Category: Ultra-safe Conservative seat

Geography: South East, Surrey. Most of Elmbridge council area.

Main population centres: Esher, Walton-on-Thames, Cobham, Molesey, Thames Ditton, Claygate, Oxshott.

Profile: This is a prosperous middle class suburban commuter area just outside the Greater London boundary and within the M25 boundary. Most of the constituency is designated as the green belt and with good commuter services into central London the area commands high property prices as is regularly cited as one of the best places to live in the UK. The constituency includes Sandown Park racecourse.

Politics: This is an extremely safe Conservative seat, held by the party since its creation in 1997 (with its predecessor Esher also only have ever returned Conservative members of Parliament). At a local level Elmbridge council is largely contested between the Conservatives and various local residents associations.


Current MP
DOMINIC RAAB (Conservative) Born 1974, Buckinghamshire. Educated at Dr Challoners Grammar School and Oxford University. Former foreign office legal advisor and Chief of staff to Dominic Grieve. First elected as MP for Esher and Walton in 2010. Junior justice minister since 2015.
Past Results
2010
Con: 32134 (59%)
Lab: 5829 (11%)
LDem: 13541 (25%)
UKIP: 1783 (3%)
Oth: 1256 (2%)
MAJ: 18593 (34%)
2005
Con: 21882 (46%)
Lab: 9309 (19%)
LDem: 14155 (30%)
UKIP: 1582 (3%)
Oth: 950 (2%)
MAJ: 7727 (16%)
2001
Con: 22296 (49%)
Lab: 10758 (24%)
LDem: 10241 (22%)
UKIP: 2236 (5%)
MAJ: 11538 (25%)
1997
Con: 26747 (50%)
Lab: 12219 (23%)
LDem: 10937 (20%)
Oth: 860 (2%)
MAJ: 14528 (27%)

Demographics
2015 Candidates
DOMINIC RAAB (Conservative) See above.
FRANCIS ELDERGILL (Labour)
ANDREW DAVIS (Liberal Democrat)
NICHOLAS WOOD (UKIP)
OLIVIA PALMER (Green)
MATT HEENAN (CISTA)
DELLA REYNOLDS (Independent)
Links
Comments - 57 Responses on “Esher & Walton”
  1. On balance, given a choice between Raab’s free-market Brexit vision and Corbyn’s ultra-statist one, public opinion would be heavily behind the latter.

    And I don’t think Dominic Raab has the immense charisma that would be required to change people’s minds on this.

  2. ‘On balance, given a choice between Raab’s free-market Brexit vision and Corbyn’s ultra-statist one, public opinion would be heavily behind the latter.

    And I don’t think Dominic Raab has the immense charisma that would be required to change people’s minds on this.’

    I don’t know about the first bit – you’re probably right – but Raab certainly gives every impression as being one of those people who’s in politics to advance the interests of people like himself – ie the rich and privileged and as the reaction to his resignation suggests he’s already seen as a laughing stock by many

  3. “On balance, given a choice between Raab’s free-market Brexit vision and Corbyn’s ultra-statist one, public opinion would be heavily behind the latter.”

    At the moment certainly yes.

    After a year or two of Prime Minister Corbyn I think a majority of the public would prefer the former.

    Unless a strong political centre re-emerges we risk bouncing backwards and forwards between governments of the hard left and hard right.

  4. I suppose if you’re in the political centre that would be bad but we did have a strong political centre in British politics when Tony Blair was PM and it achieved some great things but the common complaint was that with Labour’s move to the centre and Cameron the so called heir to Blair there was no real difference. Whether that’s true or not people got their wish. You certainly can’t say that now.

  5. That was peoples’ wish in 1997, after 18 years of quite divisive right wing government. Ironically the centrism of Blair and the coalition also lasted 18 years (1997-2015). Now we are due 2 decades of polarisation again.

  6. Tim, it’s one of the most depressing things of the whole Brexit business that people like Hunt and May feel they have to come out with such statements. I don’t know whether they think they have to show the hard Brexiteers that they are properly behind Brexit. Hunt had a very good start as Foreign Secretary, performing far better than Boris Johnson, yet still felt he had to come out with his Soviet Union nonsense, while May had gained a lot of respect from European leaders, which she risks jeopardising with her comments on queue jumping.

  7. Whilst Boris Johnson was one of the worst performing Foreign Secretaries in British history, I agree that Hunt seems to have adapted to the role pretty well but why a moderate man of his obvious intelligence would even bother in trying to appeal to some of the knuckleheads on the hard Brexit Right by pretending to support Brexit raises questions as to how astute a politician he actually is

    In attempting to broaden his base, presumably in an attempt for a run at the leadership, he could in fact be digging his grave

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