Buckingham

2015 Result:
Conservative: 0 (0%)
Labour: 0 (0%)
Lib Dem: 0 (0%)
Green: 7400 (13.8%)
UKIP: 11675 (21.7%)
Speaker: 34617 (64.5%)
MAJORITY: 22942 (42.7%)

Category: Safe Speaker seat

Geography: South East, Buckinghamshire. Part of Aylesbury Vale council area and two wards from the Wycombe council area.

Main population centres: Buckingham, Winslow, Princes Risborough.

Profile: The constituency is made up of the patchwork of affluent villages in the Buckinghamshire countryside, covering most of the Vale of Aylesbury besides Aylesbury itself. Buckingham itself is a small market town, home to the first private university in the UK. Other population centres include the town of Winslow, Princes Risborough and villages such as Cuddington, Haddenham, Ludgershall, Stewkley and Steeple Claydon..

Politics: Rural Buckinghamshire is a rock solid Tory bulwark, the Conservative equivalent of Bootle or the Welsh Valleys for Labour. In the 1960s a seat of the same name was held by Labour (represented by newspaper publisher Robert Maxwell) but that was a very different seat which included Milton Keynes within its boundaries, the current seat could never be expected to vote Labour. The current MP John Bercow was elected Speaker in 2009 and Labour and the Liberal Democrats observed the rather intermittent convention of not contesting the Speakers seat at the 2010 election. Instead John Bercow was opposed by a selection of minor parties and independents - most successful amongst them Nigel Farage, the leader of UKIP who was injured in a plane crash on the day of the election, and John Stevens, the former Conservative MEP whose campaign sent a man dressed as a dolphin to persue Bercow during the campaign to draw attention to him allegedly "flipping" his home to claim expenses.


Current MP
JOHN BERCOW (-) Born 1963, Edgware. Educated at Finchley Manorhill School and Essex University. Former merchant banker and special advisor. Lambeth councillor 1986-1990. Contested Motherwell 1987, Bristol South 1992. First elected as MP for Buckingham in 1997. Shadow Chief Secretary 2001-2002, Shadow Secretary of state for Work and Pensions 2002. Shadow secretary of state for international development 2003-2005. Speaker of the House of Commons since 2009. Bercow has undergone a remarkable transition across the political spectrum - as a student he was a member of the right-wing Monday club, and secretary of their immigration and repatriation section, when first elected he was a combatative right-winger, however in later years he mellowed, expressing more liberal and left wing views and resigning from the frontbench under Iain Duncan Smith over the issue of gay rights. He was elected Speaker in 2009, supposedly largely on the back of support from Labour MPs.
Past Results
2010
Con: (0%)
Lab: (0%)
LDem: (0%)
UKIP: 8401 (17%)
Oth: 39934 (83%)
MAJ: 12529 (26%)
2005*
Con: 27748 (57%)
Lab: 9619 (20%)
LDem: 9508 (20%)
UKIP: 1432 (3%)
MAJ: 18129 (38%)
2001
Con: 24296 (54%)
Lab: 10971 (24%)
LDem: 9037 (20%)
UKIP: 968 (2%)
MAJ: 13325 (29%)
1997
Con: 24594 (50%)
Lab: 12208 (25%)
LDem: 12175 (25%)
Oth: 421 (1%)
MAJ: 12386 (25%)

*There were boundary changes after 2005

Demographics
2015 Candidates
DAVE FOWLER (UKIP) Plumber.
ALAN FRANCIS (Green) Contested Milton Keynes North 2010.
JOHN BERCOW (Speaker Seeking Re-election) See above.
Links
Comments - 317 Responses on “Buckingham”
  1. Along with supplying Saudi Arabia with bombs to kill civiliands in Yemen, I’d argue the bedroom tax is the most unchristian and immoral policy the government’s introduced over its 5-6 years in power

    They said they wouldn’t balance the budget on the back’s of the poor and then introduce a policy like the bedroom tax which does just that – whilst giving their rich pals who mostly live in mansions a tax cut

    If you don’t think that’s as unchristian as it gets I’d suggest your concept of Christianity is about as valid as Donald Trump’s.

    I’m not a Christian myself but my instincts seem to me far more Christian than many of the current front bench – most of whom, shamefully in opinion, claim that they are

  2. JOHN D & TIM JONES-
    You are, of course, both right. In the unbelievably unlikely event that God exists, it would still be unbelievably unlikely that She would hae an opinion on the (unfair and nasty) policies of the Tory Govt. Tim- you are also right, in calling these people hypocrites.

  3. Having said all that, I think it does have to be said that this government’s commitment to foreign aid has to be widely applauded and could be considered profoundly Christian

    And whilst I think the government could be slightly more accommodating with regards the Syrian refugee crisis, elsewhere when there’s been a catastrophe the UK has always been one of the first to react, and to be fair this government doesn’t attempt to bring God into politics – whether that’s a good or bad thing

  4. TIM JONES – I’m a little uncomfortable with this seeming assumption which you have that Christianity = morality. Have you read the Bible? Justifying rape, racism, genocide? The whole concept of an almighty totalitarian dictatorship, where the holy Pol Pot needs to be believed in and worshipped to justify sparing his perpetually criticised creations from wailing and gnashing teeth? Christianity (and Islam, before H.HEMMILIG tells me off) is a disgusting and dangerous perversion of morality.

  5. Also – ” this government doesn’t bring God into politics”??? Academies? “Christian country”? Have you heard some of the stuff Nicky Morgan comes out with?

  6. On second thoughts, “perversion” is unnecessarily inflammatory – I take that back, but you get the point!

  7. Dangerous is fine, though.

  8. Neither Rees-Mogg or Bryant seem plausible candidates for the Speakership. The most likely Labour candidate is the Deputy Speaker, Lindsay Hoyle.

  9. Would Plaid stand against a Speaker? Did the SNP put up candidates against Michael Martin?

  10. Yes, the stood against George Thomas who was the then MP for Cardiff West.

  11. If these things were decided on merit Lindsay Hoyle would succeed Bercow. Unfortunately merit doesn’t seem to be the uppermost criteria by which these things are decided, otherwise Bercow and his immediate predecessor would never have got near the job. Michael Martin in particular was an embarrassment.

  12. Bercow has engaged in an astonishing and disgraceful partisan stunt today, trying to override the PM on a foreign affairs issue. He surely will be dethroned for this, and not before time.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-38884604

  13. Interesting that he was willing to welcome the President of China but not PotUS

  14. As far as I see it, the Speaker (a) has a veto on who is accepted to address MPs at Westminster Hall, and (b) is duty-bound to promote democracy, of which Mr Trump is arguably an adversary.

    If, as has been speculated, the frontrunners to replace him are Jacob Rees-Mogg and Chris Bryant, then surely today’s turn of events is bad news indeed for JRM, who was one of very few MPs to endorse Mr Trump.

  15. If a Conservative candidate for Speaker is required, I would have thought existing Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing would be a much better choice than Jacob Rees-Mogg.

  16. That Bryant can be thought to be in the running suggests the Commons is close to forfeiting the right to be considered a serious body.

  17. RUNNYMEDE: “Bercow has engaged in an astonishing and disgraceful partisan stunt…”

    This is quite an unnecessary insult to the Speaker who has every right to voice his opinion given that 200 MPS signed a motion indicating they were not in support of Mr Trump addressing Parliament in Westminster Hall*.

    He has no record of public service and he has given the impression (I’m being very generous) that he’s supporting illegal racist policies – as well as being sexist and derogatory to women; deeply insulting to civil rights leaders and vile to past Presidents.

    *May be in 2018 of 2019 when he’s earnt the right.

  18. The full motion:

    That this House deplores recent actions taken by US President Donald J Trump, including his Executive Order on Immigration and Refugees, and notably his comments on torture and women; notes the historical significance and honour that comes with an invitation to address both Houses in Westminster Hall or elsewhere in the Palace of Westminster; and calls on the Speaker, Lord Speaker, Black Rod and Serjeant at Arms to withhold permission from the Government for an address to be made…by President Trump.

  19. So it’s fine to have a Chinese dictator addressing parliament?

    But not the democratically elected President of our major ally?

    I’ll repeat what I said. This is a partisan left wing stunt, nothing more. I can only assume the aim here – assuming there is one beyond pathetic posturing – is to try to damage the progress of Brexit by upsetting the US.

    If and when Trump does anything remotely as unpleasant as Xi is responsible for, I’ll be the first to oppose his visit.

  20. “Your Highness it is my privilege to welcome you here to our Parliament for this important stage of your state visit. Your presence here today is a welcome reminder of the many intimate ties that exist between our nations and our peoples”

    This was how Berko (sic) greeted the Emir of Kuwait. According to Human Rights Watch…

    “Women continue to face discrimination in many aspects of their lives, and large legal gaps remain in protections for women. Kuwait has no laws prohibiting domestic violence, sexual harassment, or marital rape.”

    It’s also illegal to be homosexual in Kuwait.

    This lends a lot of credence to the claims that Berko’s opposition to Trump’s visit is a political stunt rather than any genuine conviction on his part.

  21. ‘I can only assume the aim here – assuming there is one beyond pathetic posturing – is to try to damage the progress of Brexit by upsetting the US.’

    The aim is surely to demonstrate to the world beyond that most Britons, unlike their prime Minister, take a dim view of Donald Trump – who is by any neutral measure a vile, bigoted and childish man, unfit to be President of the most powerful country on earth and who got 3 million less votes than his defeated rival

    Whether or not its in our interests to adopt that approach post-Brexit is a different matter entirely, but I can clearly see why Bercow said what he said, even if he shouldn’t have

  22. Bercow has always been a preening, posturing tw*t. He purported to be a ridiculous comedy right winger thirty years ago then switched to being a caricature politically correct leftie.

    He is temperamentally totally unsuited to any high office and is a good example of why the House of Commons has diminished so far in reputation in the eyes of the public.

  23. Just when I thought Bercow couldn’t sink any lower in my estimations he engages in a bit of futile, student union style no platforming. The fact that he received such warm applause from the opposition benches for doing so shows the type of politics they are interested in at the moment.

    I can’t stand Trump. If I’d had a vote I would have plumped for Clinton by the same reasoning as PJ O’Rourke; that while she may be wrong about most things she’s wrong within normal parameters. But now he’s been elected we have to deal with it, and I just think constructive engagement always achieves more than retreating into a bubble where you pretend everything in the world is exactly how you want it to be.

  24. Bercow has never grown up from his student politics days. He is a pathetic attention seeker.

  25. Paul D – in addition to what you have quoted about Kuwait, they also have in place a travel ban (which has just been extended to many of the countries on the US list).

    The hypocrisy is staggering.

  26. ‘The fact that he received such warm applause from the opposition benches for doing so shows the type of politics they are interested in at the moment.’

    That’s one way of looking at it

    It could be argued that the fact that you are making such a big deal of it shows the type of in-your-face, populist ‘chav’ politics you and your right-wing buddies are so keen on defending and bringing to this country- and I find that far more terrifying than anything Bercow said, despite his comments being wholly inappropriate considering his role

  27. But on the other hand, was Bercow’s intervention not to be considered “populist”?

  28. Kieran, I think you have just been savaged by a dead sheep.

  29. “….despite his comments being wholly inappropriate considering his role”.

    So let’s get this straight, Tim. You actually agree with me, but because you have me pigeon holed as being right wing you don’t feel you should be seen to agree with me, so you try and put some distance between us by making some extraneous point about me “making such a big deal of it”. Pathetic.

    It is quite amusing that you have so readily placed me in the box marked “hard right”. Readers of this site (and its predecessor site) with long memories will know that in the past, when the likes of Shaun Bennett were regulars, I was frequently called a wet. I would suggest that somewhere between he and yourself lies the political sweet spot.

    But ultimately it should be quality of argument that matters, not political labelling. You are all to ready to make the latter subservient to the former.

  30. “You are all to ready to make the latter subservient to the former”.

    Should of course read “you are all too willing to make the former subservient to the latter”.

  31. On Bercow, I think I agree with Heidi Allen MP, Andrew Mitchell MP & Sarah Woollancroft MP

  32. Bercow has had to apologise to the Lords Speaker, Lord Fowler, today, as he failed to consult the Lords Speaker yesterday before stating he would bar President Trump from Westminster Hall.

  33. ‘So let’s get this straight, Tim. You actually agree with me, but because you have me pigeon holed as being right wing you don’t feel you should be seen to agree with me’

    I do agree with you – but with all the terrible things going on in the world, I wouldn’t consider Bercow calling the US President what he is, something to get so enraged about

    Why not get enraged by the bombing of civilians instigated by Trump’s wannabe friend Putin, or Trump’s racist immigration ban, or his denial of global warming – or are they not as deserving of condemnation as Bercow’s comments on Trump

    I;m just tired of people on the Right in this country who actually sympathise with Trump but pretend not to

    If Brexit now means we have to cosy up and be friends to people whose values are so different to ours, it’s just adds to the belief in some circles that Brexit was an utterly demented decision

  34. Kieran W – even more amusing is that Bercow [and Tim supporting the remarks] are objecting to (the populist & failing to consult) Trump, by being populist and failing to consult!

    Bercow even got louder and directed his final remarks to the gallery (literaly) and Tory MPs.

    The pics of Bercow welcoming the Chinese leader make it all the more hypocritical.

  35. One week the emotional left wingers rage about people not respecting the ‘independent’ judiciary, the next they applaud the Speaker of the HoC. supposedly independent, behaving in a brazenly partisan way.

    It’s laughable and so infantile – real ‘four legs good, two legs bad’ stuff.

  36. “I am just tired of people on the Right in this country who actually sympathise with Trump but pretend not to”.

    I do hope that you are not including me in that particular subset of “people on the right”, thereby accusing me of being a liar for stating above that I would have voted for Clinton had I been able to. There are few better ways of stifling the kind of discussion that should be the whole purpose of sites such as this than to level accusations such as that without a shred of supporting evidence beyond your own prejudices, and the arrogant presumption that you know what people “really” believe contrary to what they’ve said.

    It is a tactic that should be beneath you, but sadly your posting history indicates that it isn’t.

    “If Brexit now means we have to cosy up and be friends to people whose values are so different to ours…”.

    It’s called living in the world as it is rather than as we would wish it to be. I am sure we all in our professional life have been placed in a situation where we have no choice but to deal with people who we think are complete idiots who should not occupy the position they are in. The grown up thing to do in that kind of situation is to try and get the best out of it. It is not to react like a stroppy teenager and retreat to our bedroom, slam the door and turn the stereo up full blast because the world doesn’t adjust itself to how we think it should be.

  37. As I’ve said previously though, this isn’t isolated.

    It’s an increasing problem of the middle class illiberal liberals.

    Their moral compass got stuck at a gauge in the ’70s and so most of them – ‘cos they hated the British/Americans/West – their default reaction to almost anything is to take the side of what they think is the oppressed minority. Although Russia, China, Islamists are in fact usually the ones carrying out the oppression on a massive scale.

    The best detailed descriptions of this tends to come from ex-Lefties who sat through such meetings. Which is why the far Left hates Bernard Ingham, Leo McKinstry et al. I think even Melanie Phillips was on the Left back then.

    They and others describe how they’d always joke, have a drink or sing a song about the then latest INLA, PLO (pick any one of 50 orgs as there were far more in the ’70s) attack because it was against their enemy.

    It’s scary but easy to see how in that context Militant or the SNP or any parochial opposition force can captivate the disaffected. Because it gets to a point that whatever a Tory or Liberal (or even Labour MP today) says, it doesn’t matter because it’s them saying it.

    It really is fingers in the ears Sturgeon mentality.

    Yes it exists on both sides but as others have described previously, it’s no surprise that it’s a particular problem on the far Left, with the twitter Echo chamber, endless marches, ‘never kissed a Tory’ mentality. Far from being tolerant or open or whatever they are supposed to be, that really is just a recipe ultimately to only befriend and breed with others on the far Left.

    Although the ‘primal scream’ was my particular favourite from the first episode of the BBC’s four part documentary, Lefties.

  38. “I am just tired of people on the Right in this country who actually sympathise with Trump but pretend not to”.

    No you’ve made your feelings about Trump perfectly clear – which is why I find it odd that you disapprove so stronly of Bercow’s comments – which you presumably agree with, yet have no problem with May’s approach of hero worshipping him, holding hands and forcing this vulgar on the Queen, the polar opposite

    ‘The grown up thing to do in that kind of situation is to try and get the best out of it.’

    But the logic of that argument could be applied to the likes of Hitler, Franco, Pol Pott and whilst Trump is clearly not in that league I think his morals and more importantly his objectives – America first at any cost – are incompatible with ours

  39. I’m just about old enough to remember cuddly ‘sunny’ Jim Callaghan forcing HM the Queen to pin a very serious honour on the chest of Nicolae Ceausescu.

    In part, if I remember correctly, connected to a grubby deal to sell aircraft.

    And of course that lovely centrist, one nation Tory John Major procured a knighthood for Robert Mugabe, a genocidal murderer.

    Wake me up when Mrs. May plumbs those depths, please.

  40. If we can allow leaders from China and sodding Kuwait to make such an address , then we can allow the democratically elected President of the U.S. to do so as well. I say this as someone who finds many of Trump’s views idiotic.

  41. To sum up the debate: Bercow was at best pushing the limits of what a Speaker should do, but he said what everyone else was thinking.

  42. ‘Then we can allow the democratically elected President of the U.S. to do so as well. ‘

    But what does May hope to get out of inviting arguably the universally loathed leader of the democratic world whose disapproval ratings in the UK exceed 80%

    Of course the standard argument is that this is May’s way of getting a good as trade deal as possible from the US, which would be fine had Trump not get elected on the mantra ‘Put America First’

    Of course given the likes of thug Mugabe and the murderous tyrant Ceausescu have been granted state visits then you can’t exactly barr Trump, but again it gives the impression of May trying to be too clever by half

  43. To compare China and Indonesia to the great democracy that is the U S.A I believe is in an insult to the U.S.A. Ergo, it was right for someone in a position of power to say, “hello”, “are you serious?!?”

    I think the Speaker’s act, is and will go down in history as, ONE of the events that made the putative, immature and pouting early regime of Donald J Trump just- at least- to think again.

    That said, I predict that Mr Speaker will go very soon – and we’ll all miss him.

  44. It was a terrible mistake by Bercow, but he obviously couldn’t care less. It’s all about his enormous ego.

  45. “Of course the standard argument is that this is May’s way of getting a good as trade deal as possible from the US, which would be fine had Trump not get elected on the mantra ‘Put America First’”.

    I think it’s more countries like India and China rather than Britain that Trump has in mind when he espouses protectionism. Maintaining cordial relations with him with a view to getting a good free trade deal is a strategy far more likely to yield any actual benefit than any amount of impotent, student union style posturing and no platforming.

  46. I’m afraid some people never grow up from student politics.

  47. ‘Maintaining cordial relations with him with a view to getting a good free trade deal is a strategy far more likely to yield any actual benefit than any amount of impotent, student union style posturing and no platforming.’

    I hope you’re right Kieran but I think the likelihood of the UK getting a good free trade deal from a Trump-led America is pretty minimal, and even if we did, I’m distinctly uneasy about cosying up to such a regime

  48. Realistically though, he has the numbers to survive. He’ll be off soon anyway, this all seems a bit childish from the Tories to be honest.

  49. Please can we not use this forum for name calling that includes people not in this forum

  50. Polltroll – “he said what everyone else was thinking” – that’s the problem, of course. He did not.

    Hence he was clapped by the SNP MPs and a few Labour MPs.

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