Brighton, Pavilion

2015 Result:
Conservative: 12448 (22.8%)
Labour: 14904 (27.3%)
Lib Dem: 1525 (2.8%)
Green: 22871 (41.8%)
UKIP: 2724 (5%)
Independent: 116 (0.2%)
Others: 88 (0.2%)
MAJORITY: 7967 (14.6%)

Category: Semi-marginal Green seat

Geography: South East, East Sussex. Part of the Brighton and Hove council area.

Main population centres:

Profile: Brighton Pavilion is the western side of the Brighton, a georgian seaside resort that has avoided much the economic.

Politics:


Current MP
CAROLINE LUCAS (Green) Born 1960, Malvern. Educated at Exeter University. Former communications officer and advisor for Oxfam. Oxfordshire county councillor 1993-1997. Contested MEP for South East England 1999-2010. First elected as MP for Brighton, Pavilion in 2010. Principal Speaker for the Green party from 2003-2006, she became the first Leader of the Green Party in 2008.
Past Results
2010
Con: 12275 (24%)
Lab: 14986 (29%)
LDem: 7159 (14%)
GRN: 16238 (31%)
Oth: 1176 (2%)
MAJ: 1252 (2%)
2005*
Con: 10397 (24%)
Lab: 15427 (35%)
LDem: 7171 (16%)
GRN: 9530 (22%)
Oth: 1014 (2%)
MAJ: 5030 (12%)
2001
Con: 10203 (25%)
Lab: 19846 (49%)
LDem: 5348 (13%)
GRN: 3806 (9%)
Oth: 1520 (4%)
MAJ: 9643 (24%)
1997
Con: 13556 (28%)
Lab: 26737 (55%)
LDem: 4644 (9%)
Oth: 2710 (6%)
MAJ: 13181 (27%)

*There were boundary changes after 2005

Demographics
2015 Candidates
CLARENCE MITCHELL (Conservative) Educated at Friern Barnet County School. Media strategy advisor, former spokesman for the McCann family and former BBC journalist.
PURNA SEN (Labour) Deputy Director of the Institute of Public Affairs.
CHRIS BOWERS (Liberal Democrat) Writer and tennis commentator. Lewes councillor since 2007. Contested Wealden 2010.
NIGEL CARTER (UKIP) Born 1950, Chelmsford. Educated at King Edward VI Grammar, Chelmsford. Contested Brighton Pavilion 2010.
CAROLINE LUCAS (Green) See above.
HOWARD PILOTT (Socialist Party GB)
NICK YEOMANS (Independent)
Links
Comments - 948 Responses on “Brighton, Pavilion”
  1. Matt Wilson,

    Agreed. Music hall concerts in favour of the Liberals became increasingly common during World War I.

  2. Having read the New History of the Labour Party, there is quite a bit about the MPs from Glasgow, who ended up being mostly marginalized by the leadership, they stood upon the platform before boarding the train and called out to the crowd that, ‘these railways will belong to the public when we return’.

    Nationally speaking the nature in which the SNP swept Scotland was similar to how in 1918 Sinn Fein swept all the seats in what later become the republic of Ireland.

  3. Tim Stanley in the Telegraph:

    “Rich boring liberals have killed the seedy, chaotic and big-hearted Brighton I love”

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/10/28/rich-boring-liberals-have-killed-the-seedy-chaotic-and-big-heart/

  4. Its not only Brighton where gentrification has that effect.

  5. Stanley’s article is spot on in so many respects but it overlooks the fact that Brighton is a much nicer place to live in today than it was 20 or even 15 years ago and that’s largely because of the emergence of the things he dislikes – good restaurants, city gastro pubs, new shops etc – much of it brought in by the people he seems to dislike – rich trendy liberals from London with cash on the hip

    What he says about the native population is totally true – the few Brightonians that still live in the town – sorry city – are far more working class and conservative than they are commonly depicted in the media and the comparison with San Francisco is apt

  6. It’s hilarious reading someone as ferociously dull and conservative as Tim Stanley remembering the good old times of ‘seediness’ and ‘chaos’. I don’t buy it coming from him for one second. It’s an article la Burchill should have penned (she would have been far funnier of course).

  7. ” the fact that Brighton is a much nicer place to live in today than it was 20 or even 15 years ago and that’s largely because of the emergence of the things he dislikes – good restaurants, city gastro pubs, new shops etc – much of it brought in by the people he seems to dislike – rich trendy liberals from London with cash on the hip ”

    Bars, restaurants and shops selling things you don’t want at prices you’re not willing to pay are seldom welcomed by the people already there.

    Which is why gentrification is not as popular with locals as it is with developers and trendies.

    In fact the locals are often caught between two competing socioeconomic trends both are which are negative for them. Gentrification from the rich and immigration from the globalised poor leaving them as a ‘squeezed middle’ in socioeconomic terms.

    While most visible in urban areas it also happens in some fashionable rural areas as well.

  8. Hove was once seen as the complete opposite of Brighton. Less seedy, less brash, more upmarket. Now Hove and Brighton are hard to tell apart.

  9. ‘It’s hilarious reading someone as ferociously dull and conservative as Tim Stanley remembering the good old times of ‘seediness’ and ‘chaos’’

    He’s a former Leftie too – having stood for Parliament as the Labour candidate in 2005 the stockbroker seat of Sevenoaks

    A good couple of years working for the right wing press seems all it takes to take hold of such people – suggesting their prior political beliefs are particularly shallow in the first place

    Right-wing sports journalist Mathew Syed is another – having stood as a Labour candidate in Oxford West

    Once such people realise where the money’s at, their entire political outlook changes

  10. Have to say I’ve never thought of Matthew Syed’s output as particularly right wing. Not sure what examples you’re thinking of.

    “Once such people realise where the money’s at, their entire political outlook changes”.

    Or they could be just examples of the well documented phenomenon of people moving to the right as they get older.

  11. ‘Have to say I’ve never thought of Matthew Syed’s output as particularly right wing. Not sure what examples you’re thinking of.’

    If you have ever read any of his columns in The Times excellent The Game supplement you’d see exactly what I mean

    He’s one of a long list of modern football writers – Martin Samuel is another – who make it their life mission to defend every excess of Premiership football and the footballers within it

    As much as I like his columns – he’s one of the best sports writers without question – it becomes a little tiring hearing him every week going on about how difficult it is for Premiership super stars just living in the modern world, how they are worth every single penny of their huge salaries, which even most football fans find excessive, and how generally brilliant they are

    ‘Or they could be just examples of the well documented phenomenon of people moving to the right as they get older.’

    But this generally happens over time – 20-30 yerars

    These people aren’t much older than when they were running for Labour. Stanley imparticular seems to have gone full circle from a well-intentioned idealist to a Europhobic nationalist within the space of five years, and I can’t imagine Syeed devoting so much of his time to defending the rich and famous as he now does

  12. ‘Or they could be just examples of the well documented phenomenon of people moving to the right as they get older.’

    It doesn’t apply to everyone of course: some people remain naive and emotional hand-wringers all their lives, or at least pretend to.

  13. Yes, and some people are born mean, nasty and soulless, and just stick with it throughout their adult lives. Funny innit!

  14. Tim, I am not sure defending the pay premiership footballers get can credibly be described as being right wing. The fact is football generates vast amounts of money. I don’t see a credible left wing critique of a situation where most of that money ends up in the pockets of the players/workers.

  15. Tim, I am not sure defending the pay premiership footballers get can credibly be described as being right wing’

    Of course it can because it entails defending the richest members of society – as if they need it in the first place – something right-wingers seem to adore doing

    ‘Yes, and some people are born mean, nasty and soulless, and just stick with it throughout their adult lives’

    Describes Runnymead perfectly – I’m sure the depths of Hell will have a special place prepared for him

    LOL

  16. There is a very good chapter in The Establishment by Owen Jones on the Premier League. In the 1950s footballers would be delegates at the TUC calling for better pay. Craven Cottage is named after the cottage next to Fulham FC ground which hosted footballers. The Premier League ended the profit sharing between the four divisions which created the big four as the clubs that can afford the players to win the Premier League and players wages.

  17. So where should the money football generates go? Should there be return to the maximum wage for players?

  18. Above was in reply to Tim Jones.

    Anyone looking for instances of unjust enrichment is barking up the wrong tree by citing premiership footballers. Would that the rest of society could be the kind of meritocracy professional sport is. Quite simply the better you are the greater the percentage of the money the sport generates you earn.

  19. There is also a vast array of hangers-on and leeches making a lot of money in football too, whose ‘talents’ are more questionable. It’s not all the rosy workers co-op you make out.

  20. I am specifically referring to what players earn.

  21. The dream job in football for someone with average ability would be that of assistant manager at a ‘big’ club.

    High wages, no obvious responsibilities other than pestering the 4th official on match days.

    Get fired, get paid out. Your colleague gets a job and takes you with them if you’re up for it.

  22. ‘Anyone looking for instances of unjust enrichment is barking up the wrong tree by citing premiership footballers. Would that the rest of society could be the kind of meritocracy professional sport is. Quite simply the better you are the greater the percentage of the money the sport generates you earn.’

    That’s exactly the line Syed takes – and as someone who never detracts from their radical right-wing view of the world you show that it’s a right wing argument by making it yourself

    As a fan, I’d far rather more of the money generated went to the clubs themselves like it used to prior to the Bosman ruling.

  23. ‘The dream job in football for someone with average ability would be that of assistant manager at a ‘big’ club.’

    Big Sam – a man of average ability in every aspect – managed to become a self-made millionaire from not being a good enough manager, as have the likes of Steve McClaren, Roy Hodgson and many many other English managers

    Whether they fail or not, the contracts they sign ensure they become millionaires either way – and whilst I can see the sense of offering unbelievably generous contracts to the likes of Guadiola, Klopp, Ferguson etc when you do to people who have a track record of more or less permanent failure, you can tell there’s too much money in the game

  24. ‘Get fired, get paid out. Your colleague gets a job and takes you with them if you’re up for it.’

    To be honest I seem to recall investment banking being a bit like that at certain times. Having said that, those banks did generally make money – unlike most football clubs.

    The other unsavoury aspect of modern football is of course the extremely dubious people who increasingly own the clubs. This being connected of course to the point in my second ppgh.

  25. “As a fan, I’d far rather more of the money generated went to the clubs themselves like it used to prior to the Bosman ruling”.

    Saying the money should go to “the clubs” is a non-answer. Who should get the money?

    “… there’s too much money in the game…”

    That’s just a cliché pub conversation aside. The fact is a lot of people are prepared to pay current prices for match tickets/season tickets/merchandise etc. They aren’t forced to do that. Should they be forced not to?

  26. It’s the TV money that has made the real difference.

  27. Well, at least I generated an interesting discussion!

  28. The issue of money in football is a classic case of price versus value. Either the footballers are worth it because that’s what the market dictates they are worth, or they are not worth it because the vast majority of people do jobs which are less glamorous, but more crucial to society, for longer hours and less money. The two are in a sense both true because they talk about different notions of “worth”.

  29. ” As a fan, I’d far rather more of the money generated went to the clubs themselves like it used to prior to the Bosman ruling. ”

    Support your local non-league club if that’s what you want.

    You’ll get a better entertainment to money spent ratio as well.

  30. ‘Saying the money should go to “the clubs” is a non-answer. Who should get the money?’

    How’s it a non-answer?

    The clubs will be here long after the current fans and players are dead and gone and had they seen some of that money which now gets eaten up in players wages, they probably wouldn’t have needed to turn to the sort of owners Runnymead refers to in his post

    Football is totally self-funding and I”m not at all arguing that top players shouldn’t earn top wages, but there’s waaay top many people in all levels of football earning good money for doing a bad job, if any job at all and when that’s the case the meritocracy argument is a tough one to sustain

    For what it’s worth as a passionate football fan I personally think in terms of quality of football the Premier League is the best thing that’s ever happened to the domestic game. But I still think its regrettable that like too many pleasures in life football has very much become a rich man’s game

  31. “Football is totally self-funding and I”m not at all arguing that top players shouldn’t earn top wages…”

    You certainly seemed to take issue with it upthread when you wrote “… it becomes a little tiring hearing him every week going on about how difficult it is for Premiership super stars just living in the modern world, how they are worth every single penny of their huge salaries, which even most football fans find excessive, and how generally brilliant they are”.

    As I said, it’s specifically the wages of the players that I am defending, and you’ve yet to really explain why that position is particularly “right wing”. If people are willing to pay a lot of money to see them play (live or on TV), or to wear the shirt they wear, then surely it’s only fair that most of that money finds its way into their pockets.

  32. Saying people should earn heaps of money is the sort of thing Tony Blair used to say to convince people – particularly your good friends the press – he was Right-wing enough to become PM – so ogf course it’s a right-wing argument. Your so far to the Right yourself that you just can’t see it

    The problem, I have with Syed is not only that he defends every excess of the game but he seems to feel genuine sympathy with multi millionaire superstars – not an especially sympathetic bunch – who he seems to genuinely see as ‘put upon’

    Were he an ex-footballer who made millions from the game himself maybe you could understand it as a self justification exercise, but as an intelligent man who at least at one stage was interested in social justice and making Britain a fairer place, his motives seem curious, if not downright mysterious

  33. It isn’t the £70 ticket a game or £2,000 season tickets that has ensured these £60,000 a week wages or £30 million transfer requests. Ending the profit sharing between the divisions and creating a ‘premier’ league, encouraging investors like Abramovich or the Guilette brothers to change the fortune of football clubs in the material sense as well as winning trophies, that is what has led to expensive contracts and 60,000 seat stadiums. The fans just pay the bill. Perhaps they should just stop, many have simply out of disgust or a lack of money.

  34. “Perhaps they should just stop…”

    Who are you to judge how other people should spend their money?

  35. “The fans just pay the bill. Perhaps they should just stop, many have simply out of disgust or a lack of money.”

    Not really. Premier League clubs now have a global fanbase, and not just in terms of watching the matches on TV. Generation Easyjet has made it easy for young middle class Europeans with spare cash to spend a weekend a month here watching their favourite team. I spend a lot of my time in Scandinavia and this is a particularly common trend there, due to their domestic leagues being generally dull and poor. There are 14 flights per day from London to Oslo but you try booking a flight to Oslo on Sunday evenings or Mondays…they are filled to bursting with people returning home from watching the football.

    I broadly echo Tim’s views on the state of English football today but there are no easy answers….the issue of TV rights and multitudinous hangers on are also a big part of the problem as Runnymede says.

  36. Someone who isn’t judging how other people spend their money. I wasn’t saying they should but merely referencing your point that they are clearly willing to pay that money. I had assumed your point was that fan are willing to pay that money and therefore they are happy with the expense in the game as long as they can continue going to watch it. Therefore if fans weren’t happy with the expense they would not continue to pay to go and watch. If I’ve misunderstood your point I’m sorry but that’s the logical assumption I made.

  37. Sports, and football especially, do have a degree of immunity from conventional market forces due to the immensely strong brand loyalty of supporters (it’s almost impossible to decide you’re suddenly a fan of another team, whereas it’s very easy to buy a different brand of kitchen roll if it’s on sale) so a lot of the usual rules of the market don’t apply. The exception can be, as mentioned above, a local non-league team, as they’re not in direct competition with your “real” team so you can choose to watch them more regularly if attending matches at the higher levels becomes unaffordable.

  38. That’s fair enough Matt Wilson. I had taken your “perhaps they should” to mean that you personally thought they should. Apologies for the misunderstanding.

    The fact that at any time fans could vote with their wallets and cut off the money supply is part of the reason why I am indifferent to the pay packets of people in football. It isn’t my money after all. I don’t bother with paying for sports channels anymore. My only financial contribution to football is tickets to watch Chesterfield a couple of times a year.

  39. I’m a Leeds United fan so even if I go to games it’s debatable whether or not it can be considered football.

  40. Paul D, it’s definatley true that clubs exploit the tribalism of fans. It’s unrealistic to expect them to switch clubs, so there can never be a free market in that sense, but they could just opt out completely.

  41. Oh my goodness. What a horrible thing to have to live with.

  42. A petition calling for proportional representation has just passed the magic 100k figure. I don’t see how parliament can refuse to debate this one:

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/168657

  43. Ben Howlett – a Conservative MP for Bath in favour of PR, is one of the members on the petition committee.

    There have not been any full debates of PR or the voting system this Parliament, so no valid grounds to refuse one either.

  44. 58 Petitions have passed 100,000 online signatures.

    426 have passed 10,000 and received a Govt response.

    They’re not the novel idea they once were.

    Although interestingly the fastest rising one at the moment is that there should not be a second Scottish Referendum.

  45. However, in just one case that I am aware of has the subject of a petition become government policy – the Sugar Tax.

    Anyone know of any others?

  46. I suppose it depends how you look at them.

    I think Peter Hennessey said a dozen came into effect – but I assume therefore that the others must just have affirmed current Govt policy (and maybe speeded up the implementation is all the others did).

  47. I could see the 15K Labour vote slumping here significantly as unlike 2015 Labour have absolutely no prospect of forming the next government. The Green majority here could rise to over five figures.

  48. Brighton Lib Dems have voted to stand aside here to support Caroline Lucas

  49. Interesting – although 2.8% hardly matters here.

    Nuttall hinted that UKIP wouldn’t stand against Leavers such as Nuttall in Bury N so I assume neither the Greens, LDs nor UKIP will stand everywhere in England and we’re back to 2010 and before.

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